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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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01-18-2018, 10:01 AM
 
Hello Everyone,

I received an e-mail from a rancher living in Trotters, North Dakota that has suffered great pain for many years with what is referred to as 'Frozen Shoulder Syndrome'. For the previous three years before starting Tiger Moves he would go to his doctor for a cortisone injection that did in fact relieve pain for a few months at a time but had no effect in terms of healing. He was getting a cortisone injection about every 4 months. But then a year and a half ago he came across his own cure and has not had a cortisone shot in that entire time. He told me that it came about because at his last visit he was warned by his doctor about the following negative side effects of cortisone injections that may include:

1) Joint infection
2) Nerve damage
3) Thinning of skin and soft tissue around the injection site
4) Temporary flare of pain and inflammation in the joint
5) Tendon weakening or rupture
6) Thinning of nearby bone (osteoporosis)
7) Whitening or lightening of the skin around the injection site
8) Death of nearby bone (osteonecrosis)
9) Temporary increase in blood sugar

So what did he do? He was talking to a friend at the church he attends about his shoulder condition and his friend told him that he understood because he too had suffered from frozen shoulder syndrome until about 5 years previous BUT that he was no longer in the slightest pain and had fully restored his range of motion and even extended it. Naturally the man (Tucker) wanted to know what his friend did to effect his cure. Tucker's friend told him, "Tiger Moves and Isometrics" And the very next week the his friend brought him both of my books 'Miracle Seven' and 'Isometric Power Revolution'.

Long story short. After a few weeks Tucker could feel his pain lessening and his range of motion gradually being restored. So much so that after six months of daily practice that he had not only restored full range of motion but had actually increased it in a dramatic way. Naturally he was writing to express his gratitude.

But there was something he stated almost rhetorically that I would like each of YOU that have experience to respond to if you will. He stated:

Quote:
"Up until I started following your exercises I don't think I ever put my shoulders or any other joints through a full range of motion at any time in my life. Not even when I lifted weights when I was in high school. At least not intentionally. Do you think that's reason so many people end up with pain in their joints? After I fixed my shoulder I started using the Tiger Move concept on all of my other joints and I could actually hear the calcium deposits being released in my neck when I started doing the neck rotation exercises. At first it was sort of loud but after a few months there was no longer any sound just a nice, smooth movement just like all of my other joints. I don't have any pain anywhere."
As I read his e-mail I was amazed at his candor and insight. So let me ask all of friends reading this, DO YOU think that Tucker is correct in that so much of the loss of range of motion in a joint or muscle is just due to the fact that it is never used in it's fullest range of motion? Personally, I think he is 'Spot On' but the reason I never really stopped to think about it before is because I have been doing Charles Atlas's full spectrum of exercises that maintain full range of motion since the time I was just a kid. In other words, I never lost it.

Anyway, please respond. I would appreciate your insights relating to Tucker's e-mail.

---John Peterson





 
 
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blackbelt blackbelt is offline
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01-18-2018, 11:04 AM
 
John,

That's an awesome story. However, I can’t say that I’m the slightest bit surprised. Over the years, I find myself coming back to the Tiger Moves again and again. I can honestly say that when I’m doing them regularly, I hardly ever experience “torn muscles”. Plus, when I’m consistent my “bad” shoulder doesn’t act up at all.

Now, in regards to your question, I don’t think there’s any doubt.

I believe that if you continually move in less than your full range of motion, that range becomes the “full” range of motion for you. Once that’s done, it takes more than a little time, and work, to regain full range of motion.
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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01-18-2018, 12:08 PM
 
Hey Rob,

Do you think that Tucker is correct in his assertion that most people almost never move their joints through a full range of motion? I invited him to call me and when we spoke he told me that he believes that there are a huge percentage of people that have NEVER moved some of their joints through a full range of motion. I think he may be on to something.

I say this because several years ago I was talking to a chiropractor that told me about a professional bodybuilder that he had worked with that could not simply twist his neck from side to side in order to look right or left but instead had to move his entire body. At the time I thought that he must be exaggerating but now I am not so sure.

----John Peterson
 
 
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blackbelt blackbelt is offline
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01-18-2018, 01:06 PM
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Peterson View Post
Do you think that Tucker is correct in his assertion that most people almost never move their joints through a full range of motion?
Sorry John. I didn't answer your initial question directly the first time.

I’m not sure I’d go so far as to say most and/or never. But, I certainly believe that a large percentage of people rarely put their joints through a full range of motion.

It’s one of those things that isn’t always “necessary” in daily life. So, many people would have to be intentional about doing so, but rarely are. We all know that doing so is beneficial. But, for many people, the idea never crosses their minds. As long as they’re able to do A, B and C they think they’re all set. Then something tragic happens…….

And, just for the record, the bodybuilder scenario seems right on the mark. I’ve seen numerous guys who are so “muscle bound”, they can’t perform even the simplest daily activity. They’ve built themselves to lift weights, and the heavier the better in their mind.
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mcj6417 mcj6417 is offline
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01-18-2018, 01:49 PM
 
John;

I agree with Tucker completely. As children, we climbed trees, crawled on the ground, sat on the floor, did all sorts of movements we don't do as adults. Especially those of us who are desk jockeys, like me. My wife has suffered from a lot of back pain these past few years because of all the sitting she does at work. There are people like Miranda Esmonde-White, Tim Anderson and Kelly Starrett who like you, are promoting healthy movement that will help joints regain range of motion safely, and without pain. As a matter of fact, I started reading Esmonde-White's material because a lot of her movements remind me of DVR's. Your programs fit a real need we have to have that suppleness and strength we have lost because of lack of movement.

Manny
 
 
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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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01-18-2018, 02:54 PM
 
In my youth I developed an interest in contact sports which combined with some rambunctious living resulted in numerous injuries – torn cartilages, tennis elbow, a whip lash, a very painful shoulder rotator cuff injury, dislocated elbow, numerous broken bones [ including several that had to be set surgically and stabilized with pins] and various pulled muscles.

One time my dad took me to the doctor concerning one of my injuries. Dad didn't understand my attraction to contact sports and expressed his concern to the doctor. The doctor looked at my father and said. “Maybe it is just in Gordon's blood”.

Whether it is Isometrics or Tiger Moves never overlook the power of your mind and projected laser like focus to strengthen and heal all types of injuries. Today at age 79 I have no sore muscles or joints.

Last edited by Andy62; 01-18-2018 at 03:06 PM.
 
 
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jonlclay jonlclay is offline
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01-18-2018, 09:17 PM
 
John,

I think you are correct as is Tucker, if you don't move your joints in a full range the joints, tendons, and muscles will tighten up and restrict themselves from allowing a full range of movement. The beauty of DVR style of exercise is with the tension you utilize your joints, tendons, and muscles learn to move through a full range of motion.

I also agree with Tucker that the neck popping can be disconcerting but does diminish over time.

One question I do have for you is when you hit the point of pain in the range of motion, how do you recommend getting the joint or muscle to open up and allow you to move beyond that range of motion? The pain factor tends to make you want to keep your range of motion restricted. Do you go to the pain limit or stay just before it hits a certain level?

Thanks,

Jon
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