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Those Focused Muscular Resistance Exercises that Don't Work
 
 
Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
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09-26-2012, 04:11 AM
 
FMT or more specifically FMR, Focused Muscular Resistance are those limb against limb self resistance exercise that the weight training community has dismissed for decades as a joke. But are they really?

Pullups are one of the hardest exercises I do. I do O.K. at them. On a test I can get fifteen or more strict reps. Most times though, I put them at the top of the workout and do them in a working range of 6-8 repetitions.

However, recently I have been sequencing my workouts different. Before I do pullups I do 2 X 25 each side with the self-resistance exercise SH-7 from Pushing Yourself to Power. I use moderate tension for that many repetitions.

Here is the point. If the self resistance exercises were such a joke, why is it that the normal range of pullups I do becomes HARDER after these FMR shoulder raises? Normally you don't associate shoulders with pullups, but I can tell you now that they certainly play a big part in getting yourself over the bar.

Try it yourself.

Greg
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Last edited by Greg Newton; 09-26-2012 at 04:15 AM.
 
 
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Dominick Dominick is offline
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09-26-2012, 12:01 PM
 
Couldn't agree more.

Conversely, if I do a lot of pullups in a session, my shoulders are cooked when I go to do, say, Tiger Bend Pushups.

Even everyone's favorite Zen Master, Matt Furey, made a point in Combat Conditioning. Something about even if you can't do many pullups, but focus on getting so you could crack off several handstand pushups. Once you'd reached that level on the handstands, go "test yourself on pullups. I think you'll be surprised."

So clearly there is a connection. Whenever I do pullups, I definitely feel it in my shoulders.
 
 
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Dominick Dominick is offline
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09-26-2012, 12:45 PM
 
To which I might add, I also notice the same "pre-exhaust" of muscles depending upon which FMR I'm using.

But, after all, FMRs "don't work"....right?
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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09-26-2012, 02:23 PM
 
Hey Friends,

FMT and FMR are superior methods of strength and fitness training.

In "The Living Strength (TM) Training System" we focus a great deal on FMR (Focused Muscular Resistance) exercises that resist one limb against another. The rep range for extremely advanced trainees is 100 reps in almost every exercise (50 reps per side on all bilateral movements) with the exception of Atlas III Push-Ups which at the most advanced level 300 daily repetitions are recommended in sets of 30 or more. These exercises(FMR) are superior for building strength, endurance, and muscle shape while infusing highly oxygenated blood and helping to heal long standing injuries. One distinct advantage that all FMR exercises have over their weight training counter part is that the level of tension can be adjusted immediately form extreme to moderate without any disruption during any given set of exercise. This cannot be done with weights but is easily accomplished with all FMR exercises as well as FMT (Focused Muscular Tension) exercises that utilize self regulated mind/muscle tension. Once again with FMT exercises that tension can be adjusted during any given set from extreme to moderate without any disruption during the set. This also makes it possible for extremely advanced men to go from exercise to exercise with no rest between sets and builds simultaneously builds heart/lung and muscular endurance that is off the charts.

---John Peterson


P.S. It is also true that Herschel Walker can be seen doing FMR exercises in exercise video clips on YouTube.
 
 
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michael michael is offline
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09-26-2012, 03:29 PM
 
FMR's are are one of my favorite because of what John wrote here:

These exercises(FMR) are superior for building strength, endurance, and muscle shape while infusing highly oxygenated blood and helping to heal long standing injuries.

The healing of injuries is my favorite part! The thing is that even when your injuried you can still do these exercises.

michael

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Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
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09-26-2012, 06:59 PM
 
Mike, Dominick and John,



Contraction of the muscles is contraction of the muscles. This stuff either works or it doesn't. Without the proper mindset and concentration it won't work. If you are locked into the "program of the month" mentality you will always be looking for the next and newest thing.

Dominick's story about Harry Pearl is a very poignant one. It is all about concentration, focus and tension. Whether you do it with Isometrics, self-resistance, extensors vs. flexors, or even with light weights, this is what drives the train.

You have to dig in and do it. However, if you doubt what you are doing and lack the patience to work at it, the results won't happen.

This post had two points. First, FMR exercise works. Second, pre-exhausting the muscles with FMR and then working a bodyweight exercise afterwards is a good way to highlight a particular part of the body. Thanks for your responses to this.

Greg
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