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Iso-Dynamic Muscle Control is not VRT
 
 
John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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06-11-2018, 09:00 PM
 
Hello Everyone,

I received an e-mail from a well meaning man asking if what I now refer to as Iso-Dynamic Muscle Control (IDMC) is the same as VRT.


Answer: The approach used in Iso-Dynmic Muscle Control is slightly different than VRT.

With VRT (Visual Resistance Training) you are advised to visualize yourself lifting extremely heavy weights, boulders, trees or anything else that you would desire. Depending upon your ability to visualize...the results can be fantastic. If, for instance you know how it feels to perform curls or presses with a pair of 50 pound dumb bells there is no reason that you cannot learn to contract your muscles at that same level of intensity or more using the visualization technique that Greg Mangan, the developer and originator of VRT advises. This method of visualization was also taught in great detail by Frank Rudolph Young, Adolph Nordkvist and many other Physical Culturist of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It works.

With Iso-Dynamic Muscle Control the emphasis IS NOT in visualizing that you are lifting anything. Instead the emphasis is in direct contraction of the opposing muscle structures by intentionally contracting your opposing muscles (your antagonist) against your performing (agonist) muscles and thereby compelling both sets of muscles to work powerfully against each other. This is what is meant by the term 'muscle control'.

So the secret to Iso-Dynamic Muscle Control is then to tense your antagonist muscles hard, thereby compelling the performing muscles (agonist) to tense harder still to overcome the increased resistance to their action. This method was first developed and mastered by Alois P Swoboda. It was Swoboda that was the first to coin the term 'muscle control'. Mastering this method then is done by attaining conscious control over both sets of muscles and contracting them in opposition to each other. Call it whatever you like but the point of the methodology is consciously contracting antagonist and agonist muscle groups against each other. This of course is the secret to mastering Tiger Moves. I once heard it described as 'moving your car with the parking brake fully engaged.' In a way...thats a reasonably good description of how it feels.

---John Peterson
 
 
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KT-John KT-John is offline
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06-16-2018, 07:48 AM
 
John

I guess this is something that I never fully understood myself.

I have a couple of follow-up questions if you don't mind:

1) So with the VRT method, the focus in on contracting the agonist (prime mover) muscles, and not engaging the antagonists, correct? Is that also done on the lowering/eccentric phase too?

2) With the Iso-Dynamic method, is this performed in a push/pull manner? (For instance, as one engages the triceps to resist the biceps when curling, do you then reverse the movement back to the starting position (elbow extension) by engaging the biceps to resist the triceps?)
 
 
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06-16-2018, 09:39 AM
 
Hello Spiderman,

Quote:
1) So with the VRT method, the focus in on contracting the agonist (prime mover) muscles, and not engaging the antagonists, correct? Is that also done on the lowering/eccentric phase too?


You're over complicating it. With VRT the focus is on imagining (visualizing) that you are lifting the heaviest possible weight and is not on focusing directly on the agonist/antagonist relationship of the muscles in opposition to each other. When properly applied the Iso-Dynamic (TRANSFORMETRICS) Method teaches you to become an expert at muscle control.


Quote:
#2) With the Iso-Dynamic method, is this performed in a push/pull manner? (For instance, as one engages the triceps to resist the biceps when curling, do you then reverse the movement back to the starting position (elbow extension) by engaging the biceps to resist the triceps?)


I once heard it described as 'Moving with the breaks on.' In a sense that is a good description as you intentionally tense the agonist/antagonist muscles in opposition to each other in all push/pull movements. So the answer is yes---BUT make sure you relax for a brief moment between engaging the push/pull so that blood can rush into the muscles.


---John Peterson
 
 
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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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06-16-2018, 10:40 AM
 
The difference can also be looked at as a matter of "focus". With VRT your focus is on an external object and with Iso Dynamic Muscle Control your focus is internalized
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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06-16-2018, 03:35 PM
 
Hey Gordon,

WOW!!! You nailed it my friend.

Quote:
The difference can also be looked at as a matter of "focus". With VRT your focus is on an external object and with Iso Dynamic Muscle Control your focus is internalized


What you have stated is the single most important and distinguishing difference between Iso-Dynamic Muscle Control and VRT.

What we teach is 'Direct', 'internalized' and 'experiential' self knowledge that is as unique and different as the people practicing these 'internalized' methods.

In fact, I had a friend that is the president of a University here in Minneapolis that asked me, "John, is it normal that you become more psychic from doing your exercise system?"

My wife Denise heard Scott ask me that question and she laughed. She then explained that she was not laughing at either Scott or his wife Rebecca but then said. "It's almost scary isn't it Scott. But, if you do an in depth study of both archeology and anthropology from the most ancient of times to the present you'll discover that ALL of the prophets, seers, sages, and shamans from every society and culture throughout all of recorded history practiced the same type of mind/muscle training exercises as a part of building psychic awareness." She then said,"If you want to study this information and get a fast education about it all, you should read Paramahansa Yogananda's 'The Autobiography of Yogi'. It's all about seers, prophets, sages and shamans from all faiths that Yogananda knew and respected. Yoganada's Course from the Self Realization fellowship even has physical training exercises that are exactly the same type that my husband teaches. The only real difference is that Yogananda taught the exercises for health and my husbands are intended for strengthening and super charging of Mind-Body&Spirit." When she finished Scott and his wife Rebecca were both blown away and awed by what Denise told them.

I then listened for over an hour as they were dialoguing with Denise and I had an opportunity to discover first hand how wide ranging my wife's knowledge truly is. Finally Scott's wife Rebecca asked, "Denise, I hope this doesn't offend you but can I ask you how old you are?" Denise smiled and said, "I was born in 1961." Rebecca then said, "I can't believe it. I thought you were at least fifteen years younger than that. What's your secret?" Without missing a beat or over stating Denise said, "I do my husband's Isometric exercises everyday for twenty minutes." Rebecca then said, "That's your secret? You have a perfect body that a high school cheer leader could envy." Rebecca then asked, "Do you have a special diet? And Denise smiled and said, "We've just had dinner together, what do you think?" To that Rebecca said, " This restaurant has the best food I've ever had in my life." To that Denise got up from the table and said, "I'll be right back." She then returned to the table a few minutes later with Joan the owner of 'Joan's in the Park' and said, "Joni, you need to hear this...Bottom line it was a great time with Scott and Rebecca and I saw first hand how much my wife really knows and practices what we teach. I also saw our table receive the most beautiful Strawberry Shortcake on the house as a result of Rebecca's compliment...absolutely fantastic.

Bottom line: getting back to it...everything we teach is internalized and as unique as the person practicing and applying it.

Thanks for your response Gordon.

---John Peterson
 
 
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KT-John KT-John is offline
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06-17-2018, 07:54 AM
 
Thank you for the clarification on both. I realize now that over the years when I would try these methods, I ended up just performing them all together in a jumbled mess.

Also, I wasn't relaxing between reps (on the Iso-Dynamic Method) and instead just kept everything tense throughout the whole set, which was very neurally fatiguing (and probably why I never stuck with it for long).
 
 
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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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06-17-2018, 12:22 PM
 
Human beings are microcosms of the larger macrocosm - the universe, and contain all of it's mysteries.
 
 
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Milbor Milbor is offline
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06-17-2018, 01:27 PM
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KT-John View Post
Thank you for the clarification on both. I realize now that over the years when I would try these methods, I ended up just performing them all together in a jumbled mess.

Also, I wasn't relaxing between reps (on the Iso-Dynamic Method) and instead just kept everything tense throughout the whole set, which was very neurally fatiguing (and probably why I never stuck with it for long).
John,

Factually, you can keep the continuous muscle tension through the range of motion during reps and during full sets. This continuous tension creates the blood occlusion in the muscles that leads to increased metabolic stress and muscle growth. But do not forget to use high levels of muscle tension of antagonistic muscle groups and mind concentration to get good results.
 
 
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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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06-18-2018, 09:16 AM
 
Iso Dynamic exercises, both dynamic and static, are a thousands of year old exercise principle that has been adapted by various individuals and groups for different purposes throughout history. They develop you from the inside/out and are mind based. "Nothing happens in the body that doesn't happen first in the mind"

They rush new mental images and ideas along the neural highway, past the preprogrammed emotional brakes, to the center of the mind which is the executive control system of our total being both conscious and subconscious.

They get the power of the both conscious and subconscious minds to work in harmony and combine their strengths to develop NERVE FORCE.

Swoboda adapted them to help people adapt to the rapidly changing world during the industrial revolution and appropriately named his version of tension exercises "Conscious Evolution" .They are equally valuable in helping us adapt to today's rapidly changing society and world.

Last edited by Andy62; 06-18-2018 at 09:19 AM.
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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06-18-2018, 10:20 AM
 
Hello Milbor,

You stated: John,

Quote:
"Factually, you can keep the continuous muscle tension through the range of motion during reps and during full sets. This continuous tension creates the blood occlusion in the muscles that leads to increased metabolic stress and muscle growth. But do not forget to use high levels of muscle tension of antagonistic muscle groups and mind concentration to get good results."


What you are referring to is Blood Flow Restriction Training. 'Occlusion' is it's most extreme application. I have personally studied this for more than a decade. In fact, the method has been around for many, many years and was discussed in Sandford Bennett's book, "Old Age, It's Cause and Prevention" published in 1912.

Here is my take. I can't think of anything more unnatural than restricting blood flow from working muscles by applying a tourniquet, a cuff, or a high pressure band. Yet, I am well aware that many people have benefited a great deal when and if BFR (Blood Flow Restriction) Training is carefully applied.

Personally, I do not recommend it because it increases the possibility of developing blood clots if the blood flow restriction as is the case with 'occlusion' training lasts for too long. Under those circumstances Occlusion training involves completely stopping blood flow into an extremity for substantial periods of time. It can damage tissue distal (below) to the occlusion. Completely occluding a limb for a substantial period of time increases the risk of blood clots in veins. Deep venous thromboses (DVT’s) can lead to pulmonary emboli, which can be fatal. Occlusion training can also lead to rhabdomyolysis (severe breakdown of muscle fibers), which can lead to kidney failure and possibly death.

I fully understand that some bodybuilders like the effects because one can seemingly increase muscle size rather dramatically by this practice with very light resistance. BUT it is not necessary to put yourself at risk if developing a lithe, lean and sculpted body is the desired goal as is the case with my Living Strength Isometric Training System. My Living Strength System with the 5-6-7 Protocol will deliver superb results for most people with zero risk of blood clots.

---John Peterson
 
 
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