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The Measurement Trap...
 
 
John Peterson John Peterson is online now
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04-12-2019, 09:49 AM
 
Hello Everyone,


I received an e-mail from a man that has told me that at one time he switched to Tiger Moves because of a weight training injury in which he tore his pectoral muscle and it had to be reattached (just the thought of it made me wince). He said that he achieved fantastic results from Tiger Moves and in some ways has improved his overall development. BUT the one thing he truly misses is the ability to accurately measure and know how much resistance he is moving. He asked me if I know of any way that one could incorporate to accurately measure Iso-Dynamic exercises?


Answer: The question he is asking could be stated for both Isometrics and Iso-Dynamic forms of exercise. The truth is that the only real measurement you have is the level of fatigue that you experience. With the methods that I teach and incorporate you will become an expert at muscle control and bodily awareness but as far as being able to measure in the way that one can when training with weights the answer is NO. So the real question is whether or not you are the kind of person that can trust his own instincts and self awareness. I personally do not have that kind of a problem but I do understand that others might.

How do the rest of you feel about this issue? Does the fact that you have no way to actually measure your exertion bother you?

It has never been an issue with me but I had mentors that had achieved obvious results that I could see just by observing how well developed they were compared to other men.

---John Peterson
 
 
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blackbelt blackbelt is offline
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04-12-2019, 11:05 AM
 
There's no doubt about it. I have fallen into this “trap” more than I care to admit. Being a “numbers guy”, it just comes naturally.

Even while being drawn to the methods promoted here, and being 100% certain they work, I still “wonder” every once in a while.

To combat this, I’ve used two things to “measure”. One is how many power calisthenics (push-ups, squats, etc.) I can do comfortably. Another is how I feel after “x” number of repetitions of various martial arts drills, some of those being side stance with a middle punch, my punching techniques, or one of any number of kicks. The better shape I’m in, the less “whipped” I feel after some workouts.

It wasn’t until recently that I even thought of breaking that mindset. I’m TRYING more and more to do things based on how I feel. Sure, I still try to keep track to I know if I’m progressing, maintaining or falling off. But, I keep coming back to wanting to “know my body”. Good or bad, that’s not at all natural or easy for me. Still, I keep trying.
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ezekial1925 ezekial1925 is offline
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04-12-2019, 04:14 PM
 
Blackbelt, You surely are not alone. U.S. society in general i think is WAY over-balanced and/or oriented to the left brain perspective; we gotta be balanced!
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is online now
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04-12-2019, 05:59 PM
 
Hey Men,

Thank You! I appreciate the feedback. Almost 40 Years ago I knew a guy that had had so many weight training-related injuries that it was almost hard to believe that as soon as he healed enough to start all over again that he would. I never saw anyone more committed to a cycle of pain, injury and rehab than he was. For example, he suffered so much pain as a result of carpal tunnel syndrome that he literally could not pick up a quarter. Finally, he had surgery to correct it. After his surgery, he asked me if Charles Atlas had any exercises for the fingers, wrists, and forearms. Naturally, I invited him over and gave him a copy of the Atlas Course and showed him all 18 of the exercises for fingers, wrists, and forearms. He not only did those exercises but he started at the beginning of the course and followed each lesson exactly as written. He achieved great results and leaned out and developed a physique that looked very much like a gymnast and he was getting lots of compliments about how great he looked but he went back to the weights because he wanted to get much bigger. The Atlas method had given him enough strength so that he could immediately start heavy and after six months of being injury free and receiving lots of compliments, he went back to the weights and was injured again...BAD...within a month.

---John Peterson
 
 
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Upshur74 Upshur74 is offline
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04-13-2019, 04:46 PM
 
As regards the "measurement trap" - as you call it - it took me years to realize that it is not about what you can do with your muscles to the weights (be it your bodyweight or dumbbells / barbells) but instead it is all about what you can do with the weight / the exercise to your muscles, i.e. how much you can get out of an exercise to exhaust your target muscles and train them save (!) and intensely. As soon as I grasped that concept of thinking it became much easier to utilize dynamic tension, isometrics and bodyweight training for optimal results within my genetic possibilities. It is all about intensity of effort, good, slow form and a well-balanced choice of maybe five to ten basic exercises. You can add some more if you like (or need) them for variety / motivation. More is not always better. Better is better.
 
 
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ezekial1925 ezekial1925 is offline
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04-14-2019, 02:19 PM
 
So John, How do you explain this man's addiction to heavy weight lifting? I mean he KNEW that resuming his weight training in the manner he previously practiced, would virtually GUARANTEE injury and yet he did just that! How do you reconcile that? What do you think is the mechanism that drives a man to do that?
 
 
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konradk konradk is offline
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04-15-2019, 08:48 AM
 
Hi John,. I have not posted in a while but this thread piqued my interest. I can see the problem isometrics have to be taken seriously. To people of a skeptical bent and scientists - including doctors - are trained to be skeptical. You could, say, point to the fat you have lost using isometric exercise and they might ask point out the diet you went on as being the cause of the weight loss. Weight lifting is easy to measure - as you said it is easy to set up an experiment which proves that after a programme of weight lifting the amount of weight you could lift rose from 100 kilos to 150 kilos when doing a bench press. But what does that prove apart from the fact that you can lift a lot of weight doing a particular exercise. It doesn't mean that you are healthy or even strong in any other way. I love weight training, personally, but I know it is not enough on its own for health. I know that even if you can master the king of barbell exercises the deadlift and lift a ton of weight off the floor does not guarantee that you won't tweak your back when lifting a 20 kilo unevenly packed cardboard box full of shopping off that same floor. And then there is the issue of general fitness how much does weightlifting crossover into life but that - and health - is another question. It seems to me that the only thing you can do to measure the effectiveness of isometric exercise (without obtaining expensive scientific equipment) is to go to the tape measure and record your measurements arm size, chest size waist size, etceters
 
 
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