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Low Tension High Rep for Definition? No Way!
 
 
John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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04-06-2012, 02:18 PM
 
Hey Friends,

I had a guy e-mail me asking about the concept of using light tension, high rep exercises for maximizing definition and losing fat. His question was, "John, in order to slim down and gain maximum definition do you recommend using high reps with light tension?"

Answer: NO WAY! The exact opposite is true. Here's the deal. In order to gain maximum definition and development you need extremely high levels of muscular tension held Isometrically or close to it at extremely High Tension while moving very slowly such as is the case Ultra High Tension DVR. Nothing creates greater definition than ultra high tension exercise. Note: Gymnast are the strongest, best developed, most well defined athletes of all. They perform movements that maximize muscle tension. Think about that. An Iron Cross is an extreme combination of DVR and Isometric Contraction combined with body weight that only the strongest of men can accomplish. Gymnast train with full body weight and the results are extraordinary. Nothing short of fantastic and they almost all have extraordinary muscular definition.

Now, high reps with light resistance is really no different than jogging as opposed to sprinting. Jogging burns calories but does nothing to build muscle because it relies on very little muscular tension and only exercises slow twitch muscle fiber, In fact by itself, without performing intense strength training, it will accelerate muscle loss and cause one to lose definition and ultimately cause one to add body fat.

Sprinting on the other hand, creates intense muscular contraction of the fast twitch muscle fibers that actually enhances and builds strong muscles while simultaneously expanding and enhancing lung capacity. Not only that but sprinting does wonderful things to the endocrine system such as creating a demand and a spike in HGH and Testosterone just like ultra intense Isometric Contraction will cause.

SO, in order to enhance muscular definition to the maximum with our exercise methods you perform Ultra Intense DVR and Isometric Contraction to maximize tension in the muscles. With true Isometric Contraction you maximize and recruit the highest possible number of muscle fibers both fast twitch and slow twitch.

Now as relates to Bodyweight exercises you do one of two things that almost seem contradictory BUT THEY'RE NOT. #1) You can perform super slow repetitions of Atlas III for example or Pull-ups for 4 to 6 Super Slow Muscle Fiber Twitching reps. This is EXTREMELY difficult because you are adding maximum DVR tension to the mix and the maximum number of muscle fibers are recruited. It is Grueling with a capitol G. How do you know you're going slow enough or adding enough tension? Because you will burn out and be unable to perform more than 6 reps max but 4 reps once you have mastered the technique. That's method # 1.

Method #2) Is to speed up to the absolute maximum while maintaining good form. Example: Sprint style Atlas III Push-Ups were what Jack King used to create his all time best physique. Jack performed partials all the way down and 2/3 of the way back up going as fast as he possibly could go while maintaining perfect form. A real sprint, this recruited maximum muscle fibers in chest, shoulders, back, and arms while at the same time required Costal breathing which in turn infused his entire upper body with highly oxygenated blood complete with growth factors. This method will create lithe, lean, and perfect muscularity. You will not get bulky in the least using it but will achieve maximum strength/endurance to body weight ratio. Jack King stood 5'10" and weighed exactly 160 pounds when he won the Masters Mr. America at the age of 61 and he had never had such extreme muscularity. Years before as an Olympic style weight lifter he weighed 198. But in his own words, "I looked my all time best in 1997 when I won the Master's Mr. America."

So the point is, either way, YOU will exert Maximum effort in order to maximize definition. Anything easy won't do it. AND OBVIOUSLY, you also need to eat right in order to not deplete your muscles so that you can burn fat.

---John Peterson
 
 
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michael michael is offline
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04-06-2012, 03:12 PM
 
Hey John,

How many reps on the DVRs do you recommend for definition?Do you think ultra intense DSRs would bring out muscular definition also?I would like to get more definition in my arms and shoulders.

michael
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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04-06-2012, 04:14 PM
 
Hey Michael,

Whether DVR or DSR, I think 3 to 5 reps and 6 at most is all anyone could really do at truly maximum tension, A real, all out Isometric Contraction on the other hand will humble just about anyone with one rep. That's how intense it is. The other thing you will notice with this type of exercise is how quickly the body heats up. You'll be sweating profusely when performing high intensity exercise. Now, in addition to the ultra intense days you will discover that you will recuperate much, much faster if you have light to moderate days in between the Ultra intense days because it will infuse the muscles with highly oxygenated blood complete with healing and growth nutrients.

---john Peterson
 
 
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PatCNJ PatCNJ is offline
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04-08-2012, 10:09 AM
 
Whether it is a set of pushups or and DVR exercise, how many sets of low reps do you recommend?

Would this intense, short hold work just as well with the PowerStrap or PowerFlex(IPR)?

I learn something new everyday.

Pat
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DOtrainee DOtrainee is offline
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04-09-2012, 11:37 AM
 
John,

I was curious as to how long each of these ultra-intense DVR repetitions take from your experience, as well as if you're tension is constant or only with the positive/negative phase. I've switched my routine to include them and my personal best is around rep 7. There's a chance I'm still working too fast.

My current goals have been to keep the rep as slow as I can breathe, linking my movements, thoughts, and intentions with the breath to maximize my "nerve force." I't feels great, but I want to make sure I'm not missing something because my nerves seem to dissipate around reps 7-8 with constant, extreme, quivering tension.

For wisdom and truth,

DOtrainee
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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04-09-2012, 01:22 PM
 
Hey Friends,

The more intense a DVR/DSR contraction is, the slower the movement will be, the longer it will take, and the fewer reps required. With Ultra Intense DVR/DSR 3 to 5 reps are plenty and two sets are all that most people can manage. Bear in mind that Ultra Intense DVR/DSR is first cousin to true Isometric Contraction.

Now as far as Speed is concerned, 3-4 ultra intense reps will require the same amount of time as 10 to 12 moderate intensity reps but it is far more exhausting. For that reason 2 sets ( 3 at most) is all anyone could handle. If one can do more than that its because he is not at ultra intensity.

When training at Ultra High Intensity DVR the muscles are taxed to the maximum but there is zero compression to the Joints. Also note this fact, IF you perform Ultra Intense DVR and try to move fast you can tear muscles and tendons. This I was told this by John McSweeney and if anyone would know it would be John McSweeney. So If you are using Ultra Intense DVR Contraction you must move very slowly.

---John Peterson
 
 
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Paul Smith Paul Smith is offline
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04-09-2012, 04:30 PM
 
John,

There has been discussion on the forum in the past about whether or not to release tension completely between DVR reps in order to take a deep breath and infuse the muscles with oxygenated blood. I contract my muscles hard on the positive and negative movement but when completed, release tension and relax momentarily, breathe deeply and then repeat. I have found that when I do not relax and breathe deeply between reps that I tax my CNS.

When referring to the recommended number of sets and reps when doing ultra-tension, and their affects, are you referring to maintaining tension throughout the entire set or following the tense, relax, tense protocol?

Thanks.

Paul
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Last edited by Paul Smith; 04-09-2012 at 04:47 PM.
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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04-09-2012, 05:45 PM
 
Hey Paul,

I was referring to maintaining maximum tension in both directions for 3 to 5 reps before relaxing. It is incredibly taxing to the muscles and the CNS. Your method which I agree with and was taught by Alois P Swoboda is very safe and utilizing it one can do higher reps even at Ultra High Tension than if one is maintaining maximum tension throughout the set. Your method is much safer for blood pressure control. BUT a person must experiment and learn what works best for them personally. There is no way that anyone can teach this method to another person it must be learned by personal application and then refined by the individual. Obviously Paul, you have done exactly that or you could not have written what you have written. Only a man with experience could have articulated that so well.


---John Peterson

 
 
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TimK TimK is offline
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04-10-2012, 02:45 PM
 
I've been doing DVRs for must be 6 or 8 years and have gotten into the habit of doing much higher reps, in the 20 to 30 range per set. So on reading this thread, I figured it was time to try things differently.
I did the DVRs with as much intensity as I could muster in the 5 rep range and found that the pump was every bit as good as when I did the higher reps, and the level of satisfaction with the workout was higher. I will have to remember to do higher intensity DVRs weekly.

Tim
 
 
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Jeff56 Jeff56 is offline
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04-10-2012, 04:58 PM
 
Thanks for the new concept. What would be the best Ultra High tension DVR exercise for maximizing definition and losing fat in the abdominals? Atlas situps, Farmer Burns stomach flattener, ??
 
 
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