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The Eight Atlas Perpetual Lesson Exercises
 
 
John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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02-23-2018, 07:35 PM
 
Hey Friends,

A man that has read my posts about my grandfather and Uncle Wally starting me out with the Atlas Perpetual Lesson for three months before doing the main course. He wonders what kind of results one would achieve from following that course exclusively. Answer: Fantastic!

Once again here are the exercises:

1) Atlas 1 Push-up (Between two chairs and feet on the floor)

2) Full Range Sit-Up (Touching Forehead of chin to Knees)

3) Full Range Leg Raise (touching toes to floor above head)

4) Atlas Balance Squats

5) Side Bends & Trunk Circles

6) Self Resistance Biceps & Triceps Exercise

7) Multi Plane Neck Movement

8) Calf Raises

The best way to accomplish 200 reps of each exercise is to perform Circuits of all 8 exercises.

For example lets say you are breaking in to this routine. If you are already in good shape 5 Circuits morning and evening of 10 repetitions each for a total of 100 repetitions of each exercise is absolutely doable. You then gradually build up to 5 sets of 20 reps of each exercise (morning and night) performed circuit style with no rest between exercises. This does not take much time.

Once you have mastered circuits of 20 you can take it from there at your own pace.

Trust me on this it isn't rocket science but when you are at 200 reps each day of each of the eight exercises you WILL be in really good shape compared to the average person and when yo are knocking of sets 50> Atlas Push-Ups and doing 5 to 10 sets daily you'll be in exceptional shape.

---John Peterson
 
 
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Upshur74 Upshur74 is offline
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02-24-2018, 05:31 AM
 
Thank you for your post John. Yes, that sounded doable. Immediately after reading your post I gave them a try (5 rounds of 10 reps each) and I feel great. However, for me personally I would throw some (more) exercises for the posterior chain from the Charles Atlas course into the mix even though the push-ups and self-resisted biceps curls may work the lats to some extent.

Exercises #3 and #4 from Lesson 1 of the course work perfect for the back even if they are "offically" listed as a chest exercise. But this is the beauty of the Charles Atlas course. If you open your eyes for the exercises you can even get much more out of them as it may seem on first sight.
 
 
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02-24-2018, 09:32 AM
 
Hey Upshur,

I have done many, many types of circuits throughout my life and just as you have said this circuit allows complete adaptability. Combine it with PowerBelt Isometrics and you can achieve results in functional strength, functional development, and a sculpted physique that will astound you.

I also agree with your assertion about exercises 3 & 4. Personally, as a general rule with few exceptions I have always incorporated Exercises #2,3, 4 & 5 along with Exercise #1 Atlas Push-Up into my own Foundational Course and recommend that EVERYONE add at least Exercise # 2 into their own daily foundation or to incorporate it any time they do a Push-Up variation. This exercise, 'Maximum Amplitude Arm Circles' is a MUST for protecting the shoulder joint and increasing/maintaining full range of motion. It should be done in both a forward and reverse motion which in essence makes it two exercises because they have excellent and opposite effects.

The truth is that the longer I live the more convinced I become that the Atlas Course truly is the greatest course ever written in terms of it wide ranging combination of protective and corrective exercises that if followed would develop the entire body evenly and synergistically.

The only problem that I have ever been aware of with the Atlas Course is that Dr. Tilney did not do an adequate job of explaining how the exercises are to be performed or of how to direct the mind in a way that would transform the positive benefits of the exercises given. The reason I say this is because from the time I was a kid in junior high and sharing the exercises with friends they always asked questions about how the exercises are done because they were somewhat confused by Tilney's directions.

I like the advice my Uncle Milo gave me when I asked him about one of Atlas's arm development exercises from lesson 9. He said to me, "Jackson, if you're not sure about any exercise, then just re-read the instructions and figure out how to do the same exercise and make it is as hard to do as you can. Anybody can figure out how to make the exercises easier but it's wise man that figures out how to make them harder." I think Milo had a good point. That's the reason I use a weight vest for my upper body exercises.



---John Peterson
 
 
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Upshur74 Upshur74 is offline
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02-24-2018, 02:31 PM
 
This is an interesting approach - not to try to make a bodyweight or self-resistance exercise easier, but harder. It reminds me to "milk" an exercise as long as possible before moving on to more difficult variations.

One thing about the Atlas course that I always wondered about was why the course preferred balance squats over "standard" squats with flat feet on the ground. Maybe it's because balance squats work the calves or can be done faster? However, with standard squats, especially deep squats, I can target the glutes more directly when I work through the heels of my foot. And even after years of squatting (my bodyweight) slow and controlled past 90 my knees are fine.

Any ideas why the Atlas course only advised to practice balance squats?
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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02-25-2018, 12:51 AM
 
Hello Upshur74,

It's an error to make it seem as though one variation fits all.

For instance the Atlas Course stated that sit-ups should be performed with legs straight and touching chin to knees on each repetition. That is precisely how I do them and always have but I learned years and years ago that less than one man in 10 can perform the exercise in that manner.

my Point: Due to differences in somatotype we all have exercises that fit our body's leverage and weight distribution far better than others. It is up to our own discretion to choose exercises wisely that yield benefit and not pain.

In my case Atlas Balance Squats with my feet forming a 'V" shape that has both of my heels touching throughout the exercise are vastly superior to all other types of squats. So much so that nothing else comes close.Yet, I know others that benefit far more from wide spaced flat footed squats. Neither is right or better for every person and the sooner we realize that we have every right to discover modifications that work best with our own physiology the better. No need to get permission from anyone.

---John Peterson
 
 
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