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Isometrics for Shoulder Pain
 
 
John Peterson John Peterson is online now
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04-19-2019, 07:17 PM
 
Hello Everyone,


I have a good friend whose daughter is a physical therapist and she is high on Isometrics. She tells me that Isometric Contraction is seeing a huge revival of interest for the primary reason that it works. She also told me that physical therapists are seeing an epidemic increase in the number of exercise-related shoulder injuries. She sent me the following article which I read with some interest. You'll note that the recommended sets of 10 to 15 repetitions are for light tension Isometrics held for 5-Seconds each. I can see the sense of this for rehabilitation purposes but trust me on this once you really learn how to contract at maximum intensity with Isometrics you will want to achieve one maximum contraction for no more than 12 seconds and of that time you will build up to maximum contraction for the first 3 to 4 seconds and then maintain it for 6 to 8 seconds. Once you master the ability to hold a maximum intensity Isometric contraction for 6 to 8 seconds you will be finished at that angle and there is no need to repeat it.

https://www.verywellhealth.com/isome...rcises-2696516

---John Peterson
 
 
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Steveo81 Steveo81 is offline
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04-19-2019, 10:57 PM
 
It’s funny that you bring this up. Ive actually been dealing with some shoulder issues myself due to the wear and tear of hard labor. One thing that seems to be giving me some relief is to first get warmed up and pumped with a single 30 rep set of tiger moves at light tension followed by 30 sec to 1 min aerobic isometric holds for the shoulders. Using the belt, I do side and front raises in 3 positions with palms facing down, then another set of those hammer grip style, followed by a standard rear upward press in 3 positions, and finally another set of the upward press with my fists turned inward all at about half of my maximum effort. It’s a satisfying burn and could be my ticket to recovery.
 
 
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Jumping-M Jumping-M is offline
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04-20-2019, 04:46 AM
 
Hello John, what is meant with exercise related shoulder injuries? Do you have some examples?
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is online now
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04-22-2019, 01:54 PM
 
Jumping-M,

When gym workouts that include heavy weightlifting are the main focus of one's regular routine, improper technique, excessive weight, lack of rest or a combination of the three can cause a great deal of wear and tear to the joint, muscles, and tendons of the shoulder. Below, are three of the most common shoulder injuries that happen in the gym.

Rotator Cuff Tear

By far, this is the most common form of injury in the shoulder. The rotator cuff is made up of four muscles that rest along the perimeter of the ball of the shoulder joint and allows the shoulder to move. This injury can happen as a result of repetitive movements like overhead lifting and cause the top of the shoulder blade to pinch at the muscles of the rotator cuff. The repetitive motion can lead to an overload on the tendons, eventually developing tendonitis. If this pain is ignored, then it can eventually lead to a tear in the rotator cuff.

Weight Lifter Shoulder

The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is at the topmost part of the shoulder blade and connects to the collarbone. For those who engage in exercises where the elbows are lowered behind the shoulders (bench press, chest fly, etc), this motion can place additional stress on this joint and bone. Over time, this can cause small tears or fractures. If not given the time to heal properly, this injury can lead to painful inflammation of the joint. This condition is often referred to as “weightlifter's shoulder“.

Dislocated Shoulder

A dislocated shoulder is a common occurrence in both gym members and athletes alike. It occurs when the ball at the top of the shoulder slips out of the socket. Once dislocated, the ball can then slip backward, forward or downward. Generally, this occurs after a strong hit to the shoulder in football or hockey; however, it can also happen if you rotate the shoulder too far.

---John Peterson
 
 
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