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Physical Fitness in Children Associated with Higher Test Scores
 
 
GB GB is offline
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03-04-2010, 11:24 AM
 
Interesting article epically if you have children. Although the article does not mention this I think that children that are fit, active and interested in being so are probably less likely to get involved in drugs. The drug problem is growing in leaps and bounds.


Physical Fitness in Children Associated with Higher Test Scores



Over the years several studies have linked physical fitness with academic performance in children and adolescents. A new report presented at the American Heart Associationsí 2010 Conference on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism brings more weight to the positive influence of physical exercise on scholastic achievements.


Lesley A. Cottrell, PhD, presenting author of the study and associate professor of pediatrics at West Virginia University, and colleagues analyzed BMI percentiles, fitness levels and standardized academic test scores of 725 fifth grade students in Wood County, WV. Two years later, the students were divided into four groups based on their physical fitness level as compared with their abilities at the beginning of the study.

Children who had the best average scores on standardized tests in reading, math, science, and social studies were at a high level of fitness at the beginning of the study and remained so into the seventh grade. The next best group academically was those who were not fit in the fifth grade, but had improved over the course of the two years. Those who remained unfit throughout the study had the worst overall test scores.

"The take-home message from this study is that we want our kids to be fit as long as possible and it will show in their academic performance," Cottrell said. "But if we can intervene on those children who are not necessarily fit and get them to physically fit levels, we may also see their academic performance increase."
The American Heart Association recommends that children and adolescents should do 60 minutes or more of physical activity daily and they participate in physical activities that are appropriate for their age and enjoyable.

While this study tracked students over time, another recent study compared fitness levels with academic test scores at a specific point in a studentís life, but found a similar association between fitness and test scores.


Researchers from the University of California at Los Angeles tested middle and high school students on fitness level by having them compete in a 1 mile run/walk test. Those who exceeded the fitness standards for age and gender also scored higher on standardized tests. Each minute slower on the fitness test represented a corresponding drop in test scores. The study was published in the January 2010 issue of the Journal of Pediatrics.

http://www.emaxhealth.com/1506/50/35...st-scores.html

GB
 
 
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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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03-04-2010, 11:35 AM
 
Make it fun- make it play and something that they want to do and look forward too. So many people developed their dislike of exercise in gym class or in the military where it was something that they had to do and many times was used as punishment.
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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03-04-2010, 12:10 PM
 
Hey Friends,

Gary, that is a great article and that is also a great response from Andy62. More than anything else, we need to change the perception about exercise as relates to our children and it's incredible benefits to enhance one's life. I totally agree that this is the most important component in reaching children.

---John Peterson
 
 
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DavidMorris444 DavidMorris444 is offline
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03-05-2010, 12:20 AM
 
Great article. Raises an interesting question for me: what age is a good age to begin light transformetrics for your child? I have 3 daughters, aged 6, 5, and 1 1/2. Obviously, the little one is not under consideration.
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monty monty is offline
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03-05-2010, 09:16 AM
 
Hey Guys,

These stats have been out for years but fall on deaf ears with school boards which are usually to busy trying to pass their own agenda. At the high school I teach at we require only one year of PE. How pathetic!!
We have quite a few kids out of 3000 who are obese and overweight. The adm. wants us to water down our fitness progarms, cause the parents call and complain that their little Betsy or Billy can't run walk/ mile cause it is too hard. Isn'y it funny how we want teachers to raise their standards but when we do it for physical fitness then we are punishing them. WHAT!!! Sick!!

The food that is served at the cafeteria is high in fat and sugar. The administartors at the top could care less about health and fitness due to trying to keep up with China and other commy countries academically. They would rather throw the money at something more politically correct than the health of kid

Many are fat and lazy themselves and only care about the money and having their name on a specific program.

DMorris- the pressure today is to put our kids in organized sports when they can walk, I strongly disagree with this due to "play" has been thrown out the window so parents can feel good that their child is an athlete at 3 years old. Studies on play have concluded that when kids just play they use their imagination plus run around using their body in may different ways.
My kids get no TV or video games during the week and only an hour or two on weekends. We get them outside playing. I think having them do some type of workout will in the end make them hate it cause again we want to make working out fun. Let them be kids and run free using their minds and developing thier personalities. My daughter is in 7th grade and ran Cross-country and now Track, she joined on her own we just encouraged her. I have been a CC and Track coach for 21 years and a competitive runner for 40, it ain't about me it is about what they want to do. Just my two cents.
Too many parents want their kid to be a athletic star so they get them in sports at 3 yr old. 70% of kids who play club sports quit sports all together by age 12. I see this everyday at the high school I work at.
We have so many helicopter parents that are living through their kids cause they could not or did not have a chance to be an athlete. It is sick and makes the kid hate their parents.
LET THEM BE KIDS!!

Monty
PS. My PE(Yoga and Boys PE) classes do a run walk two days a week, some of my students have lost up to 20lbs. I do my best to make it fun, they rebell at first but come around when they see results.
 
 
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monty monty is offline
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03-05-2010, 09:59 AM
 
ddc,

I can understand why he may not like it. I have almost 40 in a class so this makes classroom management a challenge. Kids these days are meaner than ever, I work in a school where the kids are very forgiving and kind but freshman boys can really be a bunch of knuckleheads not taking PE serious.

Hope you can find out why he is having a challenge. Does he have to dress out, this can be embarrasing for many kids. So many kids do not want to be singled out, even for something positve, so maybe thats it.
Anyway school can be hard for many, especially boys.

Monty
 
 
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armorplated armorplated is offline
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03-05-2010, 03:44 PM
 
andy
i absolutely agree, ive been screaming make it fun for forever. i have four kids and i absolutely believe that children's minds are always looking to be stimulated, they learn somethng new every second of every day. i think that exercise causes their little bodies to the exercise it needed which lets their amazing little minds focus on what is being taught.

my second daughter is hyper as all get out, but when she gets plenty of play and exercise her attention in better as well as her behavior. she also dislikes PE. her reason is the lack of options. when she wasin first gradeshegotpunishedforrunning on the track during PE but the coach told them to walk. she wanted to run...so she did. now i understand the whole listen to the coach thing but come on. she also told me that she doesnt like to play checkers and cards for PE. i was floored checkers and cards for PE. i know that not every school district is this way but parents really need to complain. when i tried the principle said not all kids liked physicial demanding activies. COME ON!!! physicial demanding is how you ger fit. fitness for the children is of absolute importance. throw out the video games and send the kids out in the yard with a ball and a glove, or foot ball, or just their imagine and watch the magic. im telling you they will be happier, healthier, and their grades will be better.

im not even going to mention the way kids eat today. when i was a kid and i wanted a snack...well first off i had to ask permission from my parents who rarely ever said no....but there was a sure grab a dozed twinkeys or a family size bag of chips and eat it all while watching tv. usually id get a piece of fruit or veggie. their was ice cream and pie and cookies at times....i didnt grow up in a prision camp. but even today if i but a bag of chips or cookies i almost always have to throw it out because it goes bad. what im saying is that parents teach kids bad eating habits and bad activity habits and they usually end up that way forever....often times obese. (ok so i did mention the way kids eat today sorry)

ok im off my soap box...sorry for the rant i just feel very strongly about this
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Last edited by armorplated; 03-05-2010 at 03:59 PM. Reason: add line about daughter
 
 
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monty monty is offline
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03-05-2010, 08:58 PM
 
Nice post aromorplated!!!

I am very passionate about this too, CHECKERS!!! WHAT THE........!!!

The problem at my school is when a parent calls the administators get scared and do not know what to do. Sometimes they do a good job of just telling parents to suck it up and that we cannot change everything for their kid but then others want us to change it.

Had an adm. who said we should have the kids do dance instead of running and walking so I said "Fine, we will do pole dancing" HAHAHA!!! LOL This is a high school. dancing!! yeah right!!

Monty
 
 
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03-08-2010, 05:25 AM
 
I have had the opportunity to see many kids' fitness levels from coaching youth football. The main factor which mostly effected the condition they were in, was the level of indifference to healthy living by the parents. Many came to practice still stuffing a Big Mac and fries down their throats. When I told the parents McDonalds and BK sell healthy chicken salads, they got offended. I recall one father talking to me after practice about his son's lack of play. The boy was overweight, above what the weight limits allowed for playing in games, and was undconditioned to a degree, that I held him back from sprints and other high exertion training. While he was talking to me, his younger son, also overweight, was growing bored with waiting around. The father's solution ---buy the kid a chocolate bar from the snack stand! It was apparent that to overcome boredom, his solution was to give the kid fattening, unhealthy candy, although there was a playground, walking trails and a fishing pond within the sports field park we were in. When I pointed this out to him, he grew offended that I would tell him what to do with his kids, but he brought up the conversation, and a frank response was the only way to truthfully answer him. One of the big delusions these parents have is that signing them up for youth sports, will automatically condition them to be healthy athletes. While helpful, the 1-2 hours they spend at practice are minimally effective if the remaining time with the parents consist of inactivity and unhealthy eating habits.
 
 
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