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John, Are You Saying 100 Push-Ups Won't...
 
 
John Peterson John Peterson is online now
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11-28-2010, 09:07 AM
 
Hey Friends,


I have received an e-mail from a person with an ulterior motive. He asks (in reference to another thread) if I am saying that one cannot possibly achieve maximum development by performing 100 Standard Atlas Push-Ups each day?

Answer: In the original Charles Atlas Course from 1922, Lesson One, page 10, Mr Atlas stated, "Now get busy and practice the exercises, especially the dipping exercise - do it as many times as you can, then relax a while and do it again. Remember I do 200 daily - see how many you can do WITHOUT STRAINING."

Now, am I saying that one will not achieve maximum development performing just 100 standard Atlas Push-Ups each day? No, not all. What I am saying is that one will achieve the maximum level of development that one can achieve from consistently performing 100 standard Atlas Push-Ups. To go beyond that point one must then make necessary changes to challenge one's muscles to make further adaptation. One way to accomplish this is obvious, that is to double or even triple the number of Atlas Push-Ups one is performing.

---John Peterson
 
 
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keith james keith james is offline
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11-28-2010, 01:18 PM
 
Hi John

If a person does just 100 reps in 1 set of the Atlas Pushups, with added tension if they desire, then they will start to make gains at the proper rate.

Not only will they make gains they can be proud of, they then can maybe start to add additional exercises to their exercise regime.

If people doubt this fact, then let them have a go at doing 100 Atlas Pushups in 1 set. There are not many people that can do this. The ones that can, they posses a great looking physique.

All the best.

KEITH JAMES.
 
 
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Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
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11-28-2010, 01:41 PM
 
Hey John,

You and I have discussed this often concerning the volume of pushups. At your level, 300 a day is maintenance. In fact, in Charles Atlas' later years, this was his maintenance number. At the level I am currently at, 100 a day is maintenance. However, to move towards something extraordinary in development requires more volume. Will that volume have to be kept forever and a day? No, there is always a maintenance level of performance, but to achieve more you must do more.

I can't help but think this is someone who is trying to antagonize Jim Forystek by misquoting you or taking what you've said out of context. As discussed in the earlier thread, Jim recommends only 100 pushups a day. However, in Jim's program, the volume is made up with high rep DSR repetitions. I think there is room for diagreement and it is nothing to get in arms over. However, as you well know, there is always someone with feet itching to run to trouble who love creating strife and contention, and for a long time there have been those who've tried to create friction between you and Jim.

Greg
 
 
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duff duff is offline
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11-28-2010, 03:23 PM
 
I think Greg is right on the money here---this doesn't sound like a question from someone interested in self-development, but a tactic to generate conflict.

In any case, the answer to such a question is obvious--do your pushups, pay attention to the results that you are getting, and adjust accordingly. You are your own master.
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is online now
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11-28-2010, 03:57 PM
 
Hey Keith & Greg,

Thanks. You both make great points. As far as numbers in and of themselves are concerned, it really depends on the individual and his own body statistics. By that I mean current strength to body weight ratios, shoulder width, limb length, leverage, weight distribution, predominance of fast to slow twitch muscle fibers (and vice versa) and one's ultimate desired goals all work together to answer to this question. For some guys, 100 might be the perfect number for what they wish to accomplish but for others it may be too little. It really depends on how far they want to take it. For example, Herschel Walker intuitively knew that he needed to perform 1,000 reps or more daily once he got to the Pros. Why am I saying that? Because in his second book that was written by Terry Todd, Herschel Walker stated that he performed 300 daily while he was in college.

---John Peterson
 
 
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gs300tx gs300tx is offline
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11-28-2010, 04:22 PM
 
Correct me if I am wrong but doest Jim Forystek perform 100 Atlas push up a day daily as a part of his program. I read some where that he performs 1 SET OF 100.

First of all, there are not a lot of guys who can do 1 SET of perfect 100 Atlas push ups, so why are the complaining about that number? I honestly believe that there is NO WAY you could not be in great physical shape and perform a single set of PERFECTLY executed Atlas 1 push ups.

Now I can understand if one has reached the point where a set of 100 push ups is easy, and in that case all you have to do is ADD TENSION. Isn't that what Dynamic Tension is all about?
 
 
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Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
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11-28-2010, 07:05 PM
 
Quote:
Correct me if I am wrong but doest Jim Forystek perform 100 Atlas push up a day daily as a part of his program. I read some where that he performs 1 SET OF 100.
This came up on the Forystek's forum awhile back. It might have even been on the old Flexercise forum. Jim said that where he can do a set of 100 Atlas pushups, he normally does them in sets to get his 100. Of course, being 6-3 and 280 pounds, Jim is a very big, large boned man. It takes a lot more strength for a big man like that to do pushups than being say 5-10 and 190 like myself.

Greg

Last edited by Greg Newton; 11-28-2010 at 07:19 PM.
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is online now
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11-29-2010, 11:16 AM
 
Hey Greg,

Not to split hairs here but I think Big Jim is about 6'1" to 6'2". The last time we met he was not more than two or three inches at most taller than me. But you are absolutely right that at 275 to 280 Big Jim is moving an incredible amount of weight. For example, lets use 280 pounds. If Big Jim were moving just 50% of his body weight with each repetition (I think it's probably closer to two thirds of his body weight) that would be 140 pounds on each repetition. Multiply that times 100 (X 100) and you end up with 14,000 pounds. Now consider a world champion bench presser going all out and performing a maximum set with 450 pounds. How many repetitions would that be? I have no clue but lets just say that it is 10 repetitions. 10 X 450 = 4,500 pounds. Bottom line: even if the worlds best bench presser did 3 X 10 with 450 he would still be behind Big Jim in terms of weight moved and would have none of the full body isometric stabilization benefits that Big Jim receives from doing his 100 Panther (Atlas 1) Push-Ups each day. Now think about this. Can you imagine how much real world strength Big Jim is using when he performs Pull-Ups? (In the past Big Jim has stated he could perform large numbers exceeding 20 repetitions.) For each set of 10 Jim would be pulling 2,800 pounds. For a set of 20 he would be moving 5,600 pounds. That my friends is in the realm of dreams for 99.99% of all men.

Believe me, Big Jim Forystek has exceptional real world functional athletic strength that is the direct result of mastering his own body weight. I know of no other man of any age that is as big as he is that could come close to matching what he can do.

---John Peterson
 
 
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12-01-2010, 03:39 PM
 
The work done with p.e. push-ups in comparison to weigth-lifting -> this calculation suits me a lot!

BWE's compose a great sum of functionell fitness factors ->
build strength, endurance, body harmony, economie of motion, will power
they sculpt a righteous character said my grandpa.

Since I've done push-ups and have incresed numbers, speed and endurance I believed in my discipline again. I'm also encouraged to set a goal and achieve it.


Best regards
__________________
You don't have to be great to start,
but you have to start to be great!
 
 
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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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12-01-2010, 04:07 PM
 
In my opinion pushups stand alone in comparison to other bodyweight calisthenic type exercises. My experience has been much the same as that of Reader. In addition too their body building benefits pushups have a mental and emotional benefit that I have never found in other calisthenic type exercises. True they build endurance,but they also develop mental toughness, tenacity, focus,will power and nerve force in much the same way as DVR/VRT, Isometrics and Isometric Power flexing do. In my opinion they are the best full body isotonic exercise that there is.
 
 
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