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Bodyweight Equivalent of Deadlift?
 
 
TejasT TejasT is offline
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01-18-2011, 09:29 AM
 
Quick question: Is there a bodyweight exercise equivalent for the deadlift exercise you all would recommend? If not, what do you all think of incorporate a sandbag or something like that to add a little resistance to my calisthenics.

I don't have to do the deadlift, but I've been trying to recreate some Steve Reeves lifting programs with bodyweights. I've been pleased with the results, but the deadlift is one exercise of his I'm having trouble thinking of an equivalent for.
 
 
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Giant Soldier Giant Soldier is offline
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01-18-2011, 10:06 AM
 
Interesting question.

I can't think of a direct correlation but a lot of the motion of the deadlift would be replicated by many of the isometric contractions or the Hindu squat.
 
 
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mcj6417 mcj6417 is offline
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01-18-2011, 10:18 AM
 
Some have had success with a DVR Deadlift. I remember someone else posting on the forum a long time ago that even Pavel Tsatsouline had demonstrated a DVR type deadlift during one of his seminars.

Manny
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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01-18-2011, 10:33 AM
 
Hello Tejas,

You can perform the Dead Lift with an Isometric Power Belt. You can also try to perform the superman wheel push-up from standing. Several men have told that the Super Man Wheel Push-Up From Standing is the closest they have ever felt to ultra heavy dead lifts from a body weight exercise.

Another great low back exercise is to lie face down on the abdomen and perform arching where you simultaneously raise legs and upper body at the same time and hold at the peak of contraction for a couple of seconds.

---John Peterson
 
 
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bmcel7 bmcel7 is offline
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01-18-2011, 10:35 AM
 
You can simply use the vrt version of the deadlift. Lean over to the ground like you would in a normal deadlift, then tense the muscles in the legs and push your feet into the ground while standing up. Squeeze your hands and arms like you are holding a heavy wait and tense your butt and lower back at the top of the movement. This brings just about every muscle in your body into play especially the abs as they resist the movement. Hope this helps
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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01-18-2011, 10:46 AM
 
Hey friends,

I forgot to mention that Jack King told me about a young guy in his gym that ruined his back permanently by performing a dead lift with around 400 pounds. This was a young man that had previously dead lifted around 600 pounds in competition so he didn't think that 400 would in any way be a big deal. Unfortunately for him he was wrong and as a result he really messed up his back. Bottom line: if you do dead lifts be careful. Back pain can be extremely debilitating. Especially when it is permanent. I'm not saying not to do them if that is what you want to do. But if you do be very careful or you may regret it the rest of your life.

---John Peterson
 
 
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tom tom is offline
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01-18-2011, 01:33 PM
 
I'd go with John's belt suggestion. Careful, because you can still pull wrong or too quickly if not careful. But isometric doesn't have the negative, the put down, phase of the deadlift and it is the negative that really can injure and overwork. For that reason, Pavel says the ideal would be if you could just drop the weight. With the belt, as soon as you stop lifting, that's that.

The reason I like the isometric version, belt or anything else, is that your hands will feel the pressure and pain and become accustomed to the feeling. Lifting a heavy weight will definitely make your hands uncomfortable. That is part of the training.

Tom
 
 
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Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
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01-18-2011, 02:05 PM
 
Hi Tejas,

As far as I know, Reeves never did deadlifts, and I've done a good bit of research on how he trained. There was that one picture of him deadlifting an Olympic barbell in the York Gym where he lifted it by gripping the edges of the plates. Some have touted this as an exercise to widen the shoulders, but Reeves did this as a STUNT, because some of the York lifters were questioning his strength since he did a lot of cramping and tensing wtih lighter weights.

For building strength and flexibility into the lower back and hips, there is no better movement than the Atlas one leg lat row. I don't say that lightly. That is my personal favorite, done DSR and Isometric. How else do you think Charles Atlas pulled the train?

Reeves, for his lower back, did one set of hyperextensions at the end of his 3 hour routine or "schedule" as he liked to call it.

Greg
 
 
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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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01-18-2011, 02:29 PM
 
I have always considered it interesting that when Steve Reeves was serving in the Phillippines for 19 months during World War II that he trained with pushups and Alois P. Swoboda and Charles Atlas type Dynamic Tension Exercises.

Last edited by Andy62; 01-18-2011 at 02:32 PM.
 
 
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duff duff is offline
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01-18-2011, 06:07 PM
 
Deadlifts work low back, legs, hips, and even upper back. If you prefer to avoid deadlifts for whatever reason (e.g. injury potential), just cover these bases with other exercises like bridges (amazing for the erector spinae back muscles), pullups, and squats.

Sandbags are also fun, but can also get quite heavy and therefore have similar potential drawbacks (if not more due to the shifting sand) as barbell deadlifts. If you prefer to train with sandbags, seek out expert advice for how to train with them, as they are a very odd thing to lift.
 
 
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