Reply
Share |
Thread Tools Display Modes
Busted Up or Age Degeneration - Take Your Pick
 
 
Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
Legacy Member


Reply With Quote
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: The Foothills of S.C.
Posts: 6,766
08-16-2012, 10:18 AM
 
One of my co-workers and I were comparing notes on pushups. A lifetime athlete, he is a couple of years old than me. Over the years he has been involved in baseball, karate, boxing and weight training. He is one of the few people I know in my age bracket who actually still looks athletic and fairly trim. Currently he does some weight training along with pushups.

Our discussion was mainly about shoulders and what he could and couldn't do. Now this guy is not what I'd call a busted up weight lifter, but he is still limited. Dips, chins and incline presses are out of the question. He still does a lot of pushups and he can bench as long as he doesn't push it or go heavy.

The point is, you have to treasure your joints. Age deterioration is real. So is long term wear and tear from athletic use (abuse). I still enjoy doing pullups and pushups and doing them in as a joint friendly way as possible, but to be honest, FMT style exercise is looking better and better all the time.

Greg

Last edited by Greg Newton; 08-16-2012 at 10:21 AM.
 
 
Share |
 
 
sbslider sbslider is offline
Senior Member

Reply With Quote
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 548
08-16-2012, 07:47 PM
 
What a timely post Greg. I am presently dealing with joint issues from my active lifestyle. I have been playing ultimate frisbee off and on for the past 30 years, in my twenty's at a national completion level. I began playing again regularly in the past couple of years, and I am now suffering from the effects. Both hips show signs of arthritic degeneration, but presently only my left hip has any pain. I have pretty much nailed the primary pain stimulus as playing ultimate. I have come to the realization that if I want to continue to live an active life for the next 50 years, I really need to stop playing the sport which has brought and continues to bring so much enjoyment to my life.

Life is full of tough choices, we each live with the consequences. FMT, body weight exercises, or any simple workout can never take the place of a team sport which I can still compete at a very high level. But I trust that God brought me to this point for a reason, I just need to be observant and see hat that reason or purpose is.

Matt
__________________
The greater the struggle, the more glorious the triumph.
 
 
Share |
 
 
isorez isorez is offline
Legacy Member

Reply With Quote
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 457
08-16-2012, 08:01 PM
 
Greg, nice post on a difficult subject for some people. As some of us are aging...you can't do now what you used to do then. It's reality. Some have to deal with the cards that they're dealt...and the hand is different than what you played 10, 12 or 20 yrs ago. Bottom line...as with everything....you have to adapt. Now, some can even do more than they used to do....but these are the people that have kept up with it as some level or one form or another. Having the choice and abilities to still keep at it in one form or another, that matches with the capabilities, that's the key.
 
 
Share |
 
 
Andy62 Andy62 is offline
Senior Member
Andy62's Avatar

Reply With Quote
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 8,934
08-16-2012, 09:54 PM
 
I think that it is like everything else IT IS MORE IN THE MIND THAN YOU THINK.

My mother was of German descent. but she was born in the US in 1894. I was born just before her 45th birthday after she had a very rough pregnancy and I almost didn't make it. As a sickly only child born to parents who had been married over 20 years and had been unable to have a child until I came along in some ways I was over protected, but not for long as mother's "will" would kick in and she would keep reminding me to develop and depend on my "will".

At one point in her 80s mother fell and broke her hip and several doctors predicted that she would never walk again,but she did

On another occasion she developed intestinal cancer which she drove into remission for years.

One time I got a call from the nursing home saying that she was near death and I went back to see her. We had a great conversation and again her "will" kicked in and she went on to live several of the most productive years of her life. She died leading the exercises in the nursing home at age 92 1/2.

When I first learned about Maxick and Sandow and the emphasis that they put on the 'mind and will power' and then found out that they were of German descent I immediately thought of my mother. SOME PARENT TAPES ARE BENEFICIAL!

In my opinion all of these other things help,but in the end it is the WILL that really counts.

Last edited by Andy62; 08-16-2012 at 10:02 PM.
 
 
Share |
 
 
Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
Legacy Member


Reply With Quote
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: The Foothills of S.C.
Posts: 6,766
08-17-2012, 05:29 AM
 
Hi Gordon,

I agree 100% that the mind is the key to keeping healthy and active. Sometimes though the activities we can get away with as a young person aren't particularly healthy for us as we age. Martial arts for example, has been a passion of mine for many decades. However, the older I get, the more I go for John McSweeney's philosophy on training.

Everything McSweeney did was for practical self-defense. The last few decades of his life he no longer sparred or practiced pre-arranged forms (kata). Often times students would want to spar with the "Old Man," and McSweeney would be very rude. "You want to fight? We'll fight and I will hurt you for real. I don't spar." Even his Tiger Moves are actually designed for delivering strikes and blocks, as opposed to pure bodybuilding.

In the same context, my friend is coming to the realization that the weight training he did for many years is not particularly healthy for his joints. Similarily, at the age we are at, neither one of us plan on going back to competitive boxing or martial arts.

Greg
 
 
Share |
 
 
Andy62 Andy62 is offline
Senior Member
Andy62's Avatar

Reply With Quote
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 8,934
08-17-2012, 08:23 AM
 
Greg, I totally agree,but I will take it a step further. I agree that what we do getting there has an effect on us in later years.

My personal opinion is that exercise is very important,but that he type of exercise may be even more imporatant. I personally believe that Focused Muscular Tension is superior to all other types of exercise and that is based on my own personal experience as well as the comments from experts such as Swami Rama, Alois P. Swoboda, and Edwin Checkley who strongly favored exercise that builds you from the inside-out.

When you practice FMT you not only exercise you mind as well as your body,but you are training your mind to control your body due to the yogic "inner concentration"principle that it applies.

I personally had numerous injuries in my youth due primarily from my participation in contact sports. They included Whiplash, dislocated right elbow, torn cartilage in right knee, left forearm broken in 4 places and had to be surgically pinned, tennis elbow,miscellaneous broken bones, and today as I am rapidly approaching my 74th birthday I have no sore joints or sore muscles which I have to attribute in large part to the practice of FMT.

History is full of examples of individuals who overcame extremely undesirable life situations and environments and,infact, used those disadvantages to make them stronger through the force of their will and their minds.

"All evolution is a reaction to stress." Alois P. Swoboda

Gordon

Last edited by Andy62; 08-17-2012 at 08:39 AM.
 
 
Share |
 
 
Jun Jun is offline
Senior Member

Reply With Quote
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 91
08-17-2012, 11:23 AM
 
Hey Greg,

I totally hear what you are saying.

I have been doing pushups for over 40 years, and sometimes I go ballistic and do some really intense side to side and one arm variations. This morning I got my right shoulder x ray because I have a pain that won't seem to heal. Can it be that push ups have worn my shoulder ? I suppose its a possibility.

My doctor said I might need cortisone. Not happy to hear that. Oh well. I'll be seeing my doc Monday to discuss the x rays.

As you said, FMT sounds good.
 
 
Share |
 
 
Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
Legacy Member


Reply With Quote
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: The Foothills of S.C.
Posts: 6,766
08-17-2012, 08:07 PM
 
Hey Jun,

Some people will disagree on this, but John and I discourage one arm pushups because of the strain on the shoulder and the rotator cuff. Both of us can do them, of course John more than me LOL, but if we ever do them it is more of a stunt than an exercise.

If you do them side to side, the possiblity of injury is not as great, although I have strained my shoulder doing them that way and overstraining for repetitions. A third variation is to put one hand on a bench or low chair and do your one armed pushups that way.

However, the best pushup is the simplest pushups. Atlas III, Military, and Tiger Stretch all done with a medium to medium wide hand spacing are probably the safest.

Greg

Last edited by Greg Newton; 08-17-2012 at 08:12 PM.
 
 
Share |
 
 
Jun Jun is offline
Senior Member

Reply With Quote
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 91
08-18-2012, 08:45 AM
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Newton View Post
Hey Jun,

Some people will disagree on this, but John and I discourage one arm pushups because of the strain on the shoulder and the rotator cuff. Both of us can do them, of course John more than me LOL, but if we ever do them it is more of a stunt than an exercise.

If you do them side to side, the possiblity of injury is not as great, although I have strained my shoulder doing them that way and overstraining for repetitions. A third variation is to put one hand on a bench or low chair and do your one armed pushups that way.

However, the best pushup is the simplest pushups. Atlas III, Military, and Tiger Stretch all done with a medium to medium wide hand spacing are probably the safest.

Greg
Greg,
This is very important information. Thank you very much for posting this. I have been making efforts to increase the longevity of my daily training and my favorite exercises. The push-up being, of course, number one.
What about the angle of the elbow ? I have been purposely avoiding going beyond a 90 degree angle at the elbow (most of the time ). What do you think ?
 
 
Share |
 
 
Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
Legacy Member


Reply With Quote
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: The Foothills of S.C.
Posts: 6,766
08-18-2012, 08:56 AM
 
Jun,

A lot depends on the lengths of the bones in your arm. In general though, and I have changed my opinion on this, but going down to no more than an 90 angle is probably the safest way for most people to do pushups. I have also found that keeping the elbows in, rather than out wide tends to be easier on the shoulders.

Greg
 
 
Share |
 
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:46 AM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.


Bronze Bow Publishing Copyright © 2008 Bronze Bow Publishing. All Rights Reserved.