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blackbelt blackbelt is offline
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01-25-2011, 07:25 AM
 
One of my co-workers has a son who is now in his first year of wrestling. Knowing that I used to also wrestle, yesterday she asked me how she can help him lose 0.3 lbs. No, I’m not kidding. She/he is trying to lose 0.3 lbs. He’s a youngster, I think 8 years old, and the 0.3 lbs would put him in the lower weight class.

My first question was about his diet, which she claims is pretty clean. I then asked about pop, and was told he drinks little.

The next questions were about his activity level. This young man has wrestling practice 3 days a week, and tournaments most weekends. While home, he is usually doing homework or playing video games.

My suggestion was to simply add more activity/exercise into his daily life. I tried to keep it simple, knowing he is so young.

It sounds like mom is going to do these exercises with him, so I recommended the following:

Push-ups
Crunches
Squats
Wrestlers bridge
MILO

I THINK I was very clear in telling her that she/he shouldn’t worry too much about “losing weight”, especially at his age. But, if anything was going to help, it would be these exercises.

I recommended doing sets of 10 here and there during the evening, and was quick to point out that if he added this extra activity, even if he didn’t “lose” the desired weight, his strength and endurance would improve so he would perform better even at the higher weight class.

What do you guys think?

Did I give her good advice and/or do you have anything to add or change?
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djanello djanello is offline
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01-25-2011, 07:59 AM
 
cut the video games !

my advice for kids is, they can play all the video games they want, IF THEY CODE THEM UP THEMSELVES.

these things build up all kinds of bad stress hormones.

substituting reading, exercise or resting for the games will prove beneficial.
 
 
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tom tom is offline
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01-25-2011, 12:14 PM
 
I have a lot of problems with the question and the premises it implies.

If she is making him wrestle, that's terrible.

If he wants to, then let him wrestle and stay out of the way. At eight, boys should be rolling around, exhausting themselves naturally until they don't want to, maybe learn a wrestling rule or technique or two, and parents get out of the way.

Eight is too young for a kid to think sets, reps, conditioning. He should just be rolling - like a kid. Unless he begs for exercises and wants to do them beside his dad or mom as they do them, fine. Otherwise, back off.

Tom
 
 
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blackbelt blackbelt is offline
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01-25-2011, 12:29 PM
 
First, I want to express that the boy wants to wrestle. He is not being forced to.

Second, I’m told that any exercises performed will be done along side the mother.

The initial thought was that he would enjoy himself more if he were in the lower weight class and thus able to DO better.

I think I made it clear that weight-loss should NOT be a goal, rather maybe a side benefit for the additional exercise/activity.
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TejasT TejasT is offline
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01-25-2011, 12:31 PM
 
For that little weight loss, he could probably temporarily lose it the day of weigh-in by sweating.

One pint of water weights around a pound. So he could jump rope and jog before the weigh-in. Sitting in a sauna also works if available (that's a trick used forever for wrestlers, fighters, etc).

Don't suggest, though, that he ever try to lose more than 1 lb of water weight. He might be able to do it, but it will leave him weak for the match, which is not what you want.

I kind of agree with the others . . . I wouldn't suggest a calorie reduction or anything. And if he has to wrestle in the higher weight division, the upside is that he will become a better wrestler (he'll be more challenged). He's going to have to go there eventually with the increased strength he'll get from your program (this is a good thing).

The fun of wrestling (like many activities) is the training, not necessarily the matches. So if he enjoys the training that's the most important part. The matches/events are just icing on the cake.

Last edited by TejasT; 01-25-2011 at 12:51 PM.
 
 
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MikeNY MikeNY is offline
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01-25-2011, 12:39 PM
 
Rob good advise! In the case you describe that seems like the best possible advise.

If he can stop the video games and play outside that would be the easist solution. But kids have changed since our generations. We played out with friend's, our dogs and loved the outside, I rarely see kids outside now. Video games fascinate them and that means they are not outside playing baseball, soccer or football with friends or just going to the park to play.


 
 
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tom tom is offline
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01-25-2011, 01:51 PM
 
Sounds good, Black. Yeah, forget the diet part. An eight year old?

Just to be annoying on the exercises, I'd say the mom can do the exercises and if the boy wants to get up from his video game and join her, fine. In my perfect world, she would not even say anything - I have known mothers my whole life and when they say something, it is never hook-free. It's a parent-child thing and can suck the joy and freedom out of many childhood moments and opportunities.

Better yet, she can wrestle her kid on the rug. Play tag. Arm wrestle for a cookie. Foot race for who clears the table.

Furthermore, a wrestling rant: Even though wrestling is one of the toughest sports and really cool in my opinion, ironically making weight is like saying, "Coach, I want to go against the smallest kid I can." That's sounds wimpy. For young, or non-olympic, non-collegiate wrestlers, in my perfect world they would wrestle whomever, whenever, and at any weight. Someone else said something like that in this thread - I agree with him.

Tom

Last edited by tom; 01-25-2011 at 01:56 PM. Reason: to rant
 
 
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monty monty is offline
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01-25-2011, 09:40 PM
 
Hey Guys,
With all due respect, I think this Mom is what is wrong with a lot of parents. She is obviously living through her son or wants her son to be a star. Maybe I am being harsh, but he is 8 !!! He should just enjoy this and his Mom needs to butt out and just encourage him and stay out of it.

Why do parents feel they need to train young kids to live like pro athletes.
Why do parents helicopter their kids. What I mean is they hover over them trying to find all the ways to make them winners. Why not let the kid and his coach figure it out.

Sorry if I come off being offensive but I have been a high school coach form 23 years and have seen this craziness ruin families or the kid gets so sick of the parents involvement that it scars the relationship.

I tell parents that my parents in the 70s just came to the sports or music concert applauded and cheered a little but stayed out of it even when I was a young kid playing sports.

This taught me to figure things out on my own and to work with my coach even if I did not like him. America is going to see more and more of the results of this.

My philosophy of parenting and teaching/coaching is to help kids become independent of me and teach them how to think for themselves.

I say Mom, let him wrestle wherever his weight is at and sit in the stands and let tit be his sport, not yours.

To have an 8 year old lose weight to make another weight class is ridiculous in my opinion.

My two cents.
Monty
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jan jan is offline
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01-26-2011, 02:08 AM
 
And it's not only the parents. I used to referee kids' soccer (up to the age of 12). During a tournament, I refereed a match between our home-team and a team from Brugge (their first team is in the top league in Belgium, among the first four I believe, so they have an honour to defend). During the game, one of the kids of the home team got a ball in his face, from close up (and I mean VERY close). I stopped the game to make sure the kid was ok. The trainer of the other team yells from the side line:"hey ref, why do you stop the game?". I had something like:"hey man, you're talking kids here, not professional soccer players." So I agree, children should PLAY, even if they are in a competitive sport.

Jan
 
 
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tom tom is offline
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01-26-2011, 02:10 AM
 
Monty, we share the same profession.

As your senior by seven years, I have to tell you that not wanting parents to helicopter their 8 year olds might be a little harsh on your part . . . since parents now helicopter well into college, don't you think the more practice they get at it the better?

Tom
 
 
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