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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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10-24-2019, 03:18 PM
 
Hello Everyone,

Earlier today I received an email from a man anxious to get the new Isometric Power Belt Course (So what else is new?). The man asked me how long one should wait between sets or between exercises and whether or not it would be the same for Isometrics as for other types of exercises. He specifically asked,

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"John, in Men's Health they say you should rest only 30 to 45 seconds between sets or exercises but I can't do that. When I have tried to do that I can get only a fraction of the number of reps in the next set. This is especially true when I'm doing bodyweight exercises like pull-ups or push-ups. So I'm wondering how long do you think is realistic to wait between sets and I also wonder if it's the same if you're doing Isometrics as it is with other types of exercises. I read your post last week about asking everyone's opinion but your own and I agree with what you wrote but I am curious about what your thoughts are on how long we should rest between sets." --Jeff Beaulieu


I've written about my friendship with Dr. Lawrence Morehouse that came about because I kept calling his office at UCLA in 1977 until I finally was able to talk with him and get my questions answered. Before the end of that original conversation, he actually took a liking to me and invited me to call back which I did on numerous occasions. Believe me, I was very surprised the first time he actually called me but tthats another story. Anyway...


I had actually asked Dr. Morehouse the question about how long to wait between sets or exercises myself, as though there was a magic number. He said...
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"The answer to your question is determined by your pulse rate." He further went on to say, "A man's pulse rate is what determines everything relating to exercise and recovery. That's why I constantly emphasize taking your own pulse because that more than anything else, is the direct measure of the intensity of your exertion. So, first of all, you need to know what your standard resting pulse rate is before you start exercising. It can vary from day to day so what you need to do is to take your pulse three times each morning after you've been awake for at least fifteen minutes. Write down whatever the average is. Let's say that it is 72 BPM. Next, you need to determine which phase of training you are in. Let's say that you're training for strength. If that's the case you'll want the intensity to be at 80% or slightly above for your maximum pulse rate of 220 minus your age while you are exercising. (If your age is 30 that means your maximum pulse rate is 190 X 80% which would be 152 so make it 155.) So what you'll do is to perform a set that is strenuous enough to elevate your heart rate from between 152 to 155 BPM. Immediately after the set take your pulse rate and then take it again after 30 seconds and wait until your heart rate is within 10 % of your standard resting pulse rate which would be about 80 BPM before starting the next set. It's your pulse rate and condition that determine when you are ready for your next set. The better shape you're in the quicker your heart rate will return to normal."



Bottom line: I'm certain that Dr. Morehouse was spot on. The important thing is to wait long enough to recover but then to hit it again as soon as you reasonably can in order to maintain a good pace while exercising. It's your heart rate that tells you when you are ready for your next set and not the seconds or minutes on your watch.

---John Peterson
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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10-24-2019, 05:10 PM
 
Hello Friends,

One thing I forgot to mention is that Dr. Morehouse was fond of saying, "Based on what?" The reason I'm telling you this is because if any of you would have talked with him and stated that you had read that rest intervals should be limited to 30 to 45 seconds he would have said, "Is that so? Based on what?"

The answer to the question, "Based on what?" was the entire premise of Dr. Morehouse's approach to strength and fitness. He wanted to know what created the greatest result for the amount of time invested and his programs were the answer to the "Based on what?" questions about strength and conditioning.

---John Peterson
 
 
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bennyb bennyb is offline
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10-27-2019, 02:17 PM
 
I do my best to rest as little as possible especially with circuit training and card workouts. If your body is not acclimated to a certain routine or the exercises tend to be really tough, resting is essential and should only rest as long as needed.

Recovery is just as important but only with what the body can handle and work within that individual's capacity. If you need a breather after a set, use it and give yourself time. The general "ruling" of rest time is usually 30 sec to 5 min depending on the type of workout you do but if your body can handle stress without rest and you can keep going at a good clip, there's no point in resting unless you take a day off and do something.

I don't like to rest in my workouts unless I seriously need it. With my circuit workouts, the only rest is marking off the set I just did and move on to the next which is barely a few seconds. In my card workouts it's a little different where if I go too hard after a few cards, I walk it off until I'm ready again. It just all depends on the type of training you do.
 
 
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TimK TimK is offline
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10-28-2019, 07:30 AM
 
I am older than John by 2 months and I don't look nearly as good as him. I am more concerned about working so hard on one day that I can't do much the next.
For instance, I generally do my pushups in sets of 50 and I set a timer to make sure I have at least 10 minutes between sets. I do pull-ups throughout the day. My workouts do not occur all at once, rather I shower, shave, stretch, cook breakfast between sets. I am a firm believer in the concept of "greasing the groove."
I will admit to brutal workouts in my youth, but one really has to listen to your own body. If you feel like crap the day after a workout, you are not doing yourself any favors.

Tim
 
 
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