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Any need to know the resistance of isometrics?
 
 
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12-19-2019, 04:02 PM
 
There is another isometric device that is a remake of the old Willie Mays exerciser. Basically a chain hooked to a plate and you change the length of the chain.

The novel part is they've implemented what amounts to an electronic scale that tells you how hard you are pulling. The intention is to give the user an objective amount of force they are applying and let them compare one workout to the next.

Now on the surface that seems like a novel approach. Some don't like that you can't easily quantify how much force you are using in isometrics. Others say the amount of force doesn't matter as long as it's enough. I've generally been in that camp.

One thing though we do know at least in regular strength training there is a negative consequence if one works much over 90% of their 1 rep max for any significant portion of time.

John, what you are your thoughts on the following:
1. What do you think of this device?
2. Do you think it would help to avoid burnout on isometrics if one knew how much force they were using.

This device is still in development so your stuff will no doubt hit the market sooner, but I wonder if some of your potential customers might bot be swayed by the fancy ad copy spend their dollars over there. I for one think it's over priced junk with quick to break electronics coming from the lowest bidder.

Any electronics that would actually work well as in be accurate to some measured degree of accuracy and continue working long term would be what I would call medical grade and easily add $1000 onto the currently over priced device

As it is today, I'd say it's worth 19.99 because it's going to have junk electronics. I could go to a farm supply store, buy some chain, a eye bolt, some diamond plate steel and make my own that would be better for not much more.

Personally, I really want the new Living Strength book. I have enough straps to do isometrics until the cows come home so I'm not in the market for yours, sorry.

P.S. regarding the book, are you going to be doing a spiral bound book? I really like that format over traditional bindings.
 
 
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12-19-2019, 07:34 PM
 
Hello Ware,


I want all of you men to see this. It's a Tony Robbins workout clip. In this clip, he has the man doing 5-second Isometrics. However, this would be totally ineffective for one very important reason. I wonder if the men here will realize what it is? When I tell you, you'll totally get it and I have a feeling that some of you will get it immediately. The reason I'm saying this is because the device Robbins uses is like an Isometric Chest press followed by an isometric Leg Press followed by an Isometric Curl

https://www.businessinsider.com/tony...plunge-2017-10


Another thing to consider is the idea that was proposed by Bullworker 50 years ago and that was that performing Isometrics on the Bullworker could build a fantastic physique. The Bullworker had a very limited application due to its inherent dimensions. It supposedly had a strength measurement gauge but that was really a joke more than anything. I mention this for one reason and that is what you need to get out of your mind the idea of measuring Isometric Contractions. In the meantime go ahead and watch the clip and post whatever insights you have from watching it.

---John
 
 
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blackbelt blackbelt is offline
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12-20-2019, 10:14 AM
 
Wow! I don’t know where to start.

First – The guy was barely breathing, if he was at all on the “isometric” machine.

Second – There’s NO way someone should do something that intense without working up to it. It seems to be a recipe for disaster.

Tony says he’ll feel it for a couple days. That means, he’s definitely not going to want to do much, in the way of exercise, for at least that long.

Why would someone do that???
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TimK TimK is offline
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12-20-2019, 12:53 PM
 
I always enjoyed the simplicity of lifting weights. For the most part there was nothing fake about the lifting experience, the metal, the men, the music...
I did not get the same feeling when working on the machines, or machine dominated gyms. Too many pretty boys working on their biceps or women in skin tight spandex distracting me.
Isometrics can be so simple and one can choose the environment. Outside? a park, a rest-stop along the freeway, in my living room with the TV on??
Using directions from the internet I built some isometric chains with handles. Using chains is a simple enough option, the "Mighty Samson" marketed chains for exercise a century ago. My set up was heavy, noisy and hard to change positions.
Frankly I don't care how much I am pulling or pushing. To me, it is how is the workout "feeling"?
John's belt is simple to use, light to transport, easy to change positions, is not noisy and is all but impossible to break.
People are just looking for a gimmick to sell. Often it is people without a history of working out that are selling those gimmicks.

Tim
 
 
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jonlclay jonlclay is offline
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12-20-2019, 01:22 PM
 
I saw a commercial today hawking a device that you grip and perform an isometric (yes they say Isometrics are great) to improve your blood pressure. The funny thing is according to the commercial you only have to do the grip isometric and it will help. Oh by the way, the device has an LED readout that I'm not sure what it tells you but probably similar to what Ware says this chain device does.

But I had to laugh that simply doing an isometric grip exercise will drop your blood pressure. I think the Kiveloff full body isometric is probably better and it doesn't cost anything!!

Jon
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12-20-2019, 04:35 PM
 
Hey Friends,

I know that we are going to be beset by those who say, "There is no way to quantify what you are doing with Isometrics" and that's true to a point. But what some people don't seem to realize is that the reason some men can lift so much more than other men is not because of greater muscular strength but oftentimes its a matter of having superior leverage. Isometric Contraction allows you to maximize strength safely at points for which YOU DO NOT have good leverage.

Now men, let me address one other point about the Tony Robbins video clip. You'll note that the man was wedged into the machine and in the Chest Press, Curl, and Leg Press he was pushing off of his back against the padded surface behind him. That doesn't happen with the New Belt because you aren't pushing off of anything. You're doing the opposite. You are stabilizing your entire body before you begin exertion and the belt's grip conforms to your hand perfectly so that you can achieve levels of muscular contraction beyond anything experienced to this time.


IN FACT, Our biggest advantage with the New Power Belt is that we will be stabilizing our entire body with Isometric Contraction before any given contraction begins for any given muscle group or angle thus turning EVERY exercise into a Full Body Kiveloff Style contraction. If you do 12 exercises at 3-stages of contraction (5-6-7) you will have done 36 contractions in total and you will accomplish that in less than 15 minutes at which time you will be sweating profusely. I personally do not go beyond 36 contractions in a workout.

---John Peterson
 
 
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12-20-2019, 06:11 PM
 
Actually, I think I'd very much like to work out on those machines. I don't know why they wouldn't work. You push against resistance, you get stronger. Nothing negates that.

I'm not worried about the kid. They likely warmed him up off camera. As long as you go into a movement loading it without a *BAM* there isn't a lot of shock to the joints.

Actually, I think this will be my fallback. I see there is one of these centers near me. I'm going to have that on the back burner, so if the book and belt don't launch, I'll be ringing in the new year at an Osteostrong facility. At least trying out the free workout they offer.

Even now John, with the weighted vest and the focus on more intensity and less volume, you are kind of admitting that you, to paraphrase Stephen Covey" had your ladder leaned against the wrong wall.

I don't mean to say that high volume work is not a way to do it, it certainly is, but more intensity seems for many to be a more direct route to the same results without the repetitive use issues that sometimes can crop up from high reps.

I also salute you for having the integrity to change your ways when you find something better rather than hiding it because it's out of sync with previous works you've published.
 
 
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12-23-2019, 03:55 PM
 
Ware,

I didn't have the option of a weight vest when I was a young man but I know that there were many times when I was young and performing 500+ Atlas push-U-ps in a single set that I realized that all I was getting was a great pump rather than an added benefit.

Had I had a weight vest as an option my goal would have been to work up to sets of 50 reps while wearing the 50+pound vest. Unfortunately, that wasn't something I had access to when I was young so the only real option open to me was going with Volume and that was something I mastered. I even got to the point that I could do a set of 500 Hindu Push-Ups in a single set which I did once weekly for almost 2 years and I was doing a set of 300 almost daily for 2-years. The Bottom line is that volume absolutely worked exceptionally well for me but at the time I didn't really have a lot of other options unless I wanted to lift weights and that was something that was not for me.

---John Peterson
 
 
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12-23-2019, 05:56 PM
 
Hey Everyone,

As relates to the OsteoStrong Isometric Contractions you would need to perform at least 3 contractions in the bench press range in order to develop full range strength. In other words, beginning with knuckles even with body, then mid-way and finally just short of full extension. Tony Robbins only showed one 5-second contraction and it appeared to me as though it was in the mid-range that the man was applying his strength. It was pretty obvious to me that he had never done that particular type of training before BUT it makes a good point in spite of the fact that he was doing only a single 5-Second contraction.

My point is this, I was nothing short of astounded by the results I achieved when incorporating Solytrains 3-Stage isometric Contraction. If you were to watch the clip again and think of the young man performing 3 consecutive contractions with only enough rest between 1 & 2 and 2 & 3 to allow blood to flood the muscle I'm sure you'll understand why it is possible to achieve such a fantastic result as relates to hypertrophy. With the first rep as the man demonstrated the blood flow to the muscle is shut off during the contraction and then when it stops the blood floods the muscle just as if you had taken a sponge and squeezed all the water out of it and then held it underwater and released it. At such time the sponge would take in a huge volume of water and that is pretty much what happens after you perform an Isometric contraction for 5-seconds and then relax and allow the blood to flood the muscle and then contract it a second time for 6 seconds trying to contract even harder than the first time and once again relaxing to let the blood flood the muscle and then finally contracting it one last time for 7-seconds striving to make the contraction as intense as you possibly can.

If you follow the procedure outlined above you will feel a pump upon the completion of your third rep that may rival anything you have previously done up t that time. And once again, for the purpose of increasing muscular size, the 'pump' is absolutely essential.

This brings up another point, when I was a kid 55 years ago in seventh grade there were quite a few Charles Atlas ads showing his students at the beginning and then after 13 weeks of training and sometimes the improvement was nothing short of amazing due to the fact that the Atlas Push-up between chairs created an extraordinary pump once you got up to the point that you were doing 200 or more reps in your morning workout. It was that particular exercise ( Atlas Push-Up Between Chairs) that made the Atlas Course so incredibly successful in its day.

---John Peterson
 
 
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12-25-2019, 12:50 PM
 
I just saw this thread after posting in the other one. I think the main purpose of Osteostrong is to strengthen bone. In order to do that, according to the inventor John Jaquish, you need to exert a maximal effort in order to create enough force to actually bend the bone, and stimulate bone growth. Once you do that, if you follow with another contraction, there is no way you are going to be able to exert the same amount of force, plus you have already stimulated the bone growth with the first one.



When it comes to muscle, I think other approaches will be superior, especially contracting through the full range of motion. I would not look to Osteostrong as a primary muscle building approach, but I think coupled with other methods used throughout the week, it makes sense.


BTW the Tony Robbins video was interesting. I have one of the 4 minute Rom trainers, got it maybe 15 years ago. It has another part you cant see in the video, on the back, that is like a stair stepper on steroids. If you really do maximal effort, on either of the stations (that kid wasn't) it will make you Puke.
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