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Training Daily? Yes, No, Maybe? It All Depends...
 
 
John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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12-21-2014, 10:39 PM
 
Hey Men,

I received an e-mail from a man asking me:


"John, I come from a weight training back ground and I always had a day or two of rest between body parts. Yet, you and Greg Newton and other men on this site seem to thrive on daily Push-Ups and other exercises every single day. I'm having a hard time getting my head around this. Wouldn't you get better results if you had rest days between?"


Answer: It all depends upon how intense your workouts are and your body's required recovery time between them. For some men, I think you may be absolutely correct, and they could easily alternate body part workouts if they so desired. On the other hand, some men may be like me or Greg and end up thriving on daily training the way we teach it.

Believe it not Loren, the old Charles Atlas Course that was so fantastically successful for five decades from 1922 to 1972 advocated training twice each day and the men thrived on it.

Another way to view it is the way my Uncle Milo once responded to the same question. He said, "When you're playing tennis the rules of golf don't apply and when you train Charles Atlas style the rules of weight training don't apply."


---John Peterson
 
 
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Prowler83 Prowler83 is offline
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12-22-2014, 10:56 AM
 
One can learn there are so many variables to consider. One is knowing your own body which I believe comes with time and experiance.

Training the same muscle group daily providing one doesn't always train to muscular failure and varying intensity can work well.
Personally I like splitting my training and major muscle groups. But some exercises I would do daily in controlled dosages. Hindu Squats and sit-ups.
Personally Pressups four times a week for me. But considering my history and past shoulder issues thats perfect for me.

Different men, different variables.
 
 
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Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
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12-22-2014, 11:11 AM
 
John,

That quote by your uncle is pretty funny, but true. Here is my experience on this.

When I started training like this years ago I couldn't train like this every day. The body had to adapt. Even 50 pushups, 50 squats and 50 situps was too much to try to do daily.

When I first started I trained every other day, then two days in a row followed by a rest day, and then three days in a row by followed by a rest day. Nowadays I train six days a week and often go long periods where I train every day.

However, there are key components to training every day. Some things I do every day, but exercises like pushups I rotate around. In other words I do 150-300 pushups every day, but I don't do the same style of pushup two days in a row. The same for any type of squatting or stepping. Since I mainly do crunch type exercises instead of sit-ups these days, I can do these most days, but still vary how I do them.

Keep your workouts short. Thirty to Forty-five minutes is optimal. If you train longer, you tend to start working on your energy reserves.

Train don't strain. It sound ambiguous, but isn't really. Always leave some in the tank. Optimally with a comprehensive workout you needs to start with a warm-up and then work into your maximum effort, then you need a cool down.

Your warm-up could be joint rotations or an easy effort on body-weight exercises, you work into your top sets, begin to back down the intensity, and then follow with bending, twisting yoga type work.

Anyway - that is my take.

Greg
 
 
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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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12-22-2014, 11:37 AM
 
If you are going to train daily you have to keep your efforts during your workouts within the limits of your recovery zone. If you feel that you are overtrainig take a day or two off.

In my opinion one of the best benefits of training daily is that it keeps thoughts and images of your training in your mind. It is the ultimate way to keep a positive mental attitude and according to research just thinking about exercise has physical as well as mental benefits.


"Experimental and clinical psychology have proved beyond the shadow of a doubt that the human nervous system cannot tell the difference between an “actual”experience and an experience imagined vividly and in detail.”

Maxwell Maltz, M.D.
“Psychocybernetics”

Last edited by Andy62; 12-22-2014 at 11:52 AM.
 
 
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TimK TimK is offline
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12-23-2014, 02:06 PM
 
It is vitally important for me at the ripe old age of 62 to warm-up and stretch-out everyday. I find that not doing some rotations for the lower back, some yoga moves and then the gravity boots means that I am stiff the rest of the day and could open me up to a back injury.
Now as long as I have done that I may as well do some deep breathing exercises......... Even if I am sick or tired I then feel that I may as well do some DVRs to get the blood moving around.
As has been stated before one does not need to do a ball-busting workout everyday; but I feel that doing something everyday is always in order.

Tim
 
 
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zorrocowboy zorrocowboy is offline
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12-23-2014, 02:25 PM
 
Some very good points have been made here. I have always gotten my best results by training daily if for no other reason than that it reshapes your mindset into incorporating exercise into your daily routine. It's a lot like brushing your teeth--once you have the habit, it's easy to just keep going! TimK, I also heartily agree with you about the positive effects daily exercise has on how you feel; for me, if I am used to daily exercise I feel very weird when I skip a day. I also use the warm-up routine from PYTP before beginning my G.U.T.S. routine, and once you've started warming up it is really easy to just slide right into your regular workout!
 
 
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TimK TimK is offline
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12-23-2014, 02:32 PM
 
Zorrocowboy,

Dead-on. One just feels better.


Tim
 
 
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M M is offline
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12-23-2014, 05:05 PM
 
Definitely some very good points made here. I think I have realised why daily training has never worked for me, and that is because I would always push quite hard (for me) each workout and in the space of a week would end up feeling rough and maybe even get ill, losing any small amount of progress. Doing it right with varying intensities must be key. Sounds obvious when saying it like that, however it can be difficult to get into that mindset when most of us have previously been brainwashed by the 'no pain, no gain' mentality of the mainstream fitness industry.

I have varied between trying the high intensity, low volume (HIT) approach, which is a very unpleasant way to train and is very off-putting, and daily training which has never worked for me either, resulting in often losing heart to even try. As with most things in life, finding a balance between 2 extremes is probably the way to go.

Mark
 
 
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weaponx weaponx is offline
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12-24-2014, 06:41 PM
 
Merry Christmas Men!!
As far as daily training goes here is my input: I used to train every day with hundreds of reps, pushups,squats,situps. Every day, pretty soon I wondered why after all these reps I didn't look like her herschel walker! I think the short answer was I got used to the workouts. At 40 years old and continually researching I came up with a template and rep scheme that I'm satisfied with. I focus on "planes of motion" rather than exercises and I do 20 minutes of "heavy hands" with no weight, while walking on a treadmill, outside or stepping. Utilizing Johns isometric techniques, harder bodyweight exercises and walking every day I feel like a superhero!
 
 
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Alex74 Alex74 is offline
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12-25-2014, 03:09 PM
 
Please explain heavy hands and planes of motion.
Thank you.
Alex
 
 
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