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Aerobic Isometrics & Its Benefits
 
 
bennyb bennyb is offline
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12-11-2009, 03:38 PM
 
Lately cause of Matt Furey & The Iso Power Belt I have been just hammering into isometrics roughly aerobic style. Holding certain postures for periods of time are not only difficult but rewarding at the same time. I usually time the holds now especially on tablemakers and press using the IPB. So far my best time in a tablemaker is just over 2:45, for that particular time it was pretty intense knowing that after about a min. your arms feel like electricity is shooting through skin and your legs are wobbling a bit. I practice this exercise quite often but I keep in mind of the exercises in IPR plus holding postures like in yoga and shaolin monk training. For the Power Belt it is insane and so different holding certain positions such as a press or curl or deadlift, at first usually if you're into isos you just wanna pull/push as hard as possible for 10 seconds or less. So far no matter what position im in I can't hold no more then less a couple min. Its that hard. The belt doesn't give a damn what you do if you do too much for a period of time it will hurt you. If you put too little into an iso even for a min. you will want to put full force into it. I personally believe that discipline is key to holding positions with the belt. Certain people say Isometrics don't build super power or it isn't that hard holding a position for minutes at a time. Those are the people who don't know or don't see a reason to do it and its their choice but I find and I think plenty of people will agree with me is that Isometrics not only builds super strength and power but brings a balance into any other system. If I didn't do isometrics I would not be able to bend, rip or scroll the things I do as a strongman cause like they say Isos build speed as well as strength well see how fast a guy rips a phonebook without tricking it or bends a really tough peice of steel and tell me Isometrics didn't have anything to do with it.
 
 
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MikeNY MikeNY is offline
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12-11-2009, 05:47 PM
 
Bennyb 2 minutes and 45 second Isometrics is just radical! Great work!

They use to use ten reps for Isometrics. For Atlas DSRs, Macfadden exercises, the Commander Set of Isometrics and Dynaflex. Ten reps right and left sides, Solitary Fitness still uses that 10 rep idea for the Atlas DSRs, always was a favorite.

There was even something like the powerbelt, a steel bar (with two flattened sections to stand on) and attached ny a nylon rope to a second steel bar. You did weightlifting type Isometrics; a lot of guys did 10 reps.

Benny you, John, BK, Gordon and I all agree Isometrics are the true source of radical strength.
 
 
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12-11-2009, 06:45 PM
 
I also am a fan of isos and enjoy seeing the input from BK, Benny, John, Greg, Joe, Mike and others. Iíd be interested in knowing if you do them daily, cycle through them doing isos everyday but not always the same exercise or, take rest periods? Seems to me like Doing Bennyís style isos daily would be rough.

The original Dynaflex course (which I purchased back in the 60s) and the Minute a Day isometric exerciser which I also had (and still have) both stated that the isometric exercises had to be performed 7 days a week. I think we all realize that that is not the case but I think that many still do.

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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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12-11-2009, 06:52 PM
 
Isometrics in any form are awesome. They go straight to the control center of your mind and build strength from within.

The reason this type of exercise is so superior is illustrated by the following quote by Swami Rama referring to the Isometric Power Flexing exercises in his book "Exercise Without Movement."

"The exercises in this book,however, are yoga practices with benefits far exceeding ordinary muscular movement. In these subtle exercsies one visualizes muscles, respiration,senses, nervous system, and mind.....Exercise without movement, however,is a systematic method of exercise that allows the practitioner to travel along the pathways of action,from mind to muscle..... They are the preliminary steps to mastery of the autonomic nervous system. Most importantly, in these exercises one comes to experience the tremendous potential of the mind itself,and one makes the dramatic step inward through the layers of personality toward the Center of mind and consciousness."
 
 
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12-11-2009, 11:35 PM
 
GB I also have my original 1960's Snyder Mfg. Co., Philidelphia PA; Isometric Body Exerciser; along with the Instructions called the "Conditioning Series" and I bought Dynaflex also. Dynaflex was so roughly written everyone was doing it differntly, I made notes and worked at it, modified it. John's Isometric Powerflex is clear and easy to understand, anyone can do it. Gordon and other's have told me people were doing the Atlas Course as Isometrics also. So it must have worked just as well as Isometrics as it did done normaly.

A lot of guys were doing Isometrics daily, and many were always doing those 10 rep sets of each Isometric. I do not know who invented that; but I'd guess Atlas or one of the early guys because it was so common. Maybe Gordon knows who started using ten reps of each isometric? I see DSRs, Isometric Powerflexing, DVRs and CIC all as Isometrics, just variations.

I had to stop Isometrics & exercising after my operation, and will restart next week. I'm now able to do the M7 and VRT. I was thinking of doing the Commander Set of Isometrics and or Dynaflex Isometric Powerflex and using the 10 reps with one set, starting next week, or maybe just using just one of those.

Hold onto your "Minute a Day isometric exerciser" it is like mine almost an antique. I still have my Whitely Gym with Chest Expander, Jump Rope and Hand exercisers, lost the box with time. I stupidly tossed out my Whitely Krusher Grip Exerciser because one wooden handle was loose in 2000!

 
 
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12-12-2009, 04:27 PM
 
Mike,

I agree the Dynaflex course was very poorly written and illustrated. I purchased the one that had photos and several of the photos just did not jive with the descriptions.

The Minute a Day exerciser is a keeper for me even if it had not value to anyone else mine was a present. Iíve modified, repaired and built several similar devises over the years.

Iím curious do you do the exercises daily, 7 days a week, or since you combine the Dynaflex with other isometrics do you have some other schedule?

One last question Ėassuming that you must be satisfied with the long term results / benefits of the Dynaflex exercises seeing youíve been doing them for so long. Any particular benefits that you have noticed and attribute to these or this type of exercise?

GB
 
 
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12-12-2009, 04:52 PM
 
Gary I love Dynaflex, simple, fast, efficent and if you are doing one rep takes mere 7 to 10 seconds per exercise, same for the Commander Set of Isometrics. I've also done the 10 reps per exercise many times over the years, it works wonders. Yeah the pictures are horrible and the cartoons were worse, I drew in red arrows to show directions and red stars for breathing directions (one star for each breath) and basicly rewrote it; and used the breathing from the Commander Set, about the same breathing as JP teachs for the M7 and Isometric Powerflexing. I've always felt that Isometrics made me fitter and strong. At 7 to 10 seconds per exercise you can rip through Dynaflex and the Commander Set fast. Right now I stopped my Isometrics for my recovery, but I do them 7 days a week and have for years; looking forward to restarting. Isometrics make for a fine companion to PCs.

I love my Isometric Exerciser, just replace the nylon rope as it ages, the steel never ages. I'll never get rid of that. A few of my friend's through the years cobbled together copies for themselves. Love it but have not used it anywhere near as much as Isometrics. I love all versions of Isometrics, M7, VRT, Dynaflex Isometric Powerflexing , Commander Set, CIC, Powerflex & DSRs.
 
 
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12-12-2009, 06:03 PM
 
Mike,

By the way several months ago (after reading several references you made to the book) I was able to get a copy of How to Keep Fit and Like it with the Commander set of exercises you often refer to. Interesting book and a great addition to my library, thanks.

The biggest problem I had with the Minute a Day exerciser was that I eventually bent the handle and the nylon rope just did not hold up. The adjustment mechanism, simple and efficient, would dig into the rope and cause it to break down, in part due to an uneven edge.

For lovers of isometrics IPR is simple, effective and efficient covering exercises from head to toe and giving you enough info to experiment and develop other exercises on your own if you desire. I think that the discussions, experimentation, and feed back about isometrics here is great and I appreciate your, Greg’s John’s, Benny's, BK’s and others input.

GB
 
 
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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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12-12-2009, 06:40 PM
 
Here is the link to "How To Keep Fit" from the sandow site:

http://www.sandowplus.co.uk/Competit...bum/index.html
 
 
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bennyb bennyb is offline
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12-12-2009, 07:17 PM
 
This is what I love about isometrics. So many ways to do them and many variations. I've done the commander sets a time or 2. Can be done anywhere. I guess because of the feats I do isometrics are mandatory. If anybody knew you cannot bend or rip something without an isometric contraction. By rip I mean a legit rip of a phonebook, the popping or the baking is just a trick even a 110 pound woman in her late 40's can even do. 2 men I find to have a huge influence on isometrics is Alexander Zass & Bruce Lee. There are others but nobody has gotten strong at their field then these 2 guys.
 
 
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