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maximizing DVR Tension?
 
 
BEAVIS BEAVIS is offline
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10-01-2010, 12:44 PM
 
I love pushups of all kinds. my reps are getting pretty high per set now and i'm not seeing the results I had a few months back. I know it's all about the mind/muscle connection but any ideas how can I maximize DVR Tension when it comes to pushups?
 
 
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monty monty is offline
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10-01-2010, 01:58 PM
 
Beavis ,

In a post John says his Uncle Milo did the Milo between sets. The Milo between pushups sets should pump you up and wok the muscles to the extreme. I sometime do a DVR between sets and it really fatigues the muscles. I also sometimes do not take a lot of time between sets, you will be able to do less reps but will get a good pump. I heard of a workout where a guy does 3 pushups every 10 seconds or so, he does this for 20- 30 min. The push ups are done somewhat slow. I have never done this but have slowed down my reps and it really fatiques me fast.

Today I did 10 chin/pulls and 25 pushups on the minute for 20 min. 200 pull/chin ups, 500 push ups.
I then did 200 more various pushups. My goal is 1000 today, will see what happens.

Monty
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duff duff is offline
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10-01-2010, 04:05 PM
 
What results are you looking for? Increased reps? Muscular size? Fat loss? Definition?

Also, are you wanting to add DVR tension to pushups? I've experimented from time to time with doing fewer pushup numbers but imagining that someone is sitting on my back to engage the chest, shoulders, and triceps with added DVR tension (making the pushups harder).
 
 
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BEAVIS BEAVIS is offline
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10-01-2010, 07:05 PM
 
monty, a 1000 and duff I'm just want to increase my intensity so my reps drop back below 25. I seem to get the best results using a 2/2 rep cadence and 20-25 per set. thanks
 
 
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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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10-01-2010, 07:42 PM
 
Visualization is the secret to increasing tension during DVRs. Whether you visualize a person sitting on your back as Duff does or something else it will work for you.
 
 
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Johnny Johnny is offline
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10-02-2010, 04:40 AM
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by duff View Post
What results are you looking for? Increased reps? Muscular size? Fat loss? Definition?

Also, are you wanting to add DVR tension to pushups? I've experimented from time to time with doing fewer pushup numbers but imagining that someone is sitting on my back to engage the chest, shoulders, and triceps with added DVR tension (making the pushups harder).
Hey Duff...

Can you please give us the tips for each of the sought out results:
1- Increased Results:
2- Muscular Size:
3- Fat Loss:
4- Definition:

Thank you.
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shamus23 shamus23 is offline
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10-02-2010, 05:12 AM
 
Have you considered slowing the reps down ? A ten second motion up and ten seconds down maybe?
 
 
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Max McKinley Max McKinley is offline
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10-02-2010, 11:08 AM
 
Hey Beavis,

Everyone has offered great advice. In other words, all of the above. I love the Milo personally. And as Gordon said, visualization is the key to this. It truly is the mind-muscle connection that will make the difference.
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duff duff is offline
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10-02-2010, 03:19 PM
 
Quote:
Hey Duff...

Can you please give us the tips for each of the sought out results:
1- Increased Results:
2- Muscular Size:
3- Fat Loss:
4- Definition:
Well, your results may vary, but here are my thoughts on the matter. Clearly genetics, diet (including protein intake, how clean you diet is, etc.), sleep, lack of other psychological and physical stress, mind-muscle connection, limb lengths, how much your muscles consist of slow-twitch or fast-twitch fibers, etc. will also play significant roles in your individual results. I also think it's important to think about your specific goals and why you want them and how they fit into your life as a whole.

There are a number of basic training protocols for bodyweight calisthenics that emphasize different things:

1) Grease the Groove

10-25 sets of 30-50% one set max reps spread throughout the day. This trains neuromuscular efficiency primarily, the skill of the movement and firing the muscles. The aim is totally avoid fatigue and train the exercise like a skill hence the multiple brief practice sessions a day. You can also do different schedules here, like exercise 3-5 times a day in 5-10 minute segments, never going to failure or even fatigue.

GTG doesn't get your heart rate going very much or for very long, so my thought is that it's less valuable a training method for fat loss. By itself, it's probably not optimal for increasing muscular size either, excepting that you do pump your muscles with blood many times a day. Your aim is to become more efficient at the same movement, so it will definitely help strength to bodyweight ratio though. It's decent for increased definition, but only if you are already lean---otherwise more intense training will help burn fat.

GTG can definitely be used in conjunction with other methods though for those outcomes---I think it's a great technique for getting reps high enough (by training neuromuscular efficiency/skill) to then switch to something like GUTS or other interval training. When I'm doing GTG style training, I like to test myself in one set maximum every so often (perhaps once a week or once every couple weeks), and based on that test, increase the reps per set, but feel free to experiment.

Since the volume is already quite high from GTG training, be careful not to add too much more volume if you also do other training or you might burn out. I like doing GTG for like a month or so, then switching back to other more dense/intense methods.

2) Density training

The basic idea of density training is to do more work in the same or less time, increasing the work/time ratio. I'm currently experimenting primarily with this type of training. So you could do 20 rounds of 1 minute and do 5 or 10 pushups on the minute for a total of 100 or 200 pushups. Do your set at the time of the minute and rest the remaining time (or superset with a second exercise like TBS). I've been experimenting with a starting total volume for 20 rounds of 1 minute being 5 x one set maximum, but play around with it to find what works best for you (will depend on how many days a week you train and what other exercises you do, for instance).

Your aim is then to slowly increase this number while holding the time the same (20 minutes) -OR- to reduce the amount of time and keep the total volume the same (e.g. 15 minutes for 100 pushups). Since you are doing more work in the same or less time, you are increasing the demands on your body which then adapts to the increasing demands, provided you give it enough nutrition and rest to do so.

One of the nice things about density training is that you know when your workout is over! I tell myself that if I can't commit to exercising 20 minutes 3x/week minimum, then what's wrong with my life! LOL Seriously though, your workouts get more and more productive (in the literal sense of that word) with density training. GUTS for example is an extremely dense training protocol---I can't do nearly that much work in that amount of time yet, even when I break up the sets so that I don't have to do so many reps in a row.

You can also reduce the number of rounds and do more per set. This doesn't make it more dense, but does challenge your endurance and help increase reps per set in one set maximum. For instance, if you are doing 300 pushups in 20 rounds of 1 minute (15 reps each), try doing the same 300 pushups in 10 rounds of 2 minutes (30 reps each), just for variety. More reps per round will also make it more fatiguing.

Density training is overall good for fat loss, muscle size, and definition. One could probably optimize muscle size with even more volume and/or longer rests between higher rep sets though (see below), but overall it's hard core training especially if you keep gradually increasing the density and do at least 20 minutes worth 3-7 times a week. This will get your heart, lungs, and muscles working like crazy.

A different protocol is just to watch the clock for your total time (whether 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, or whatever) and do as many reps as you can of either 1, 2, or 3 exercises. Then each workout, attempt to beat your previous best. This will be hard, and probably shouldn't be attempted daily, more like 2x/week at max.

Anyone who is currently training for GUTS while keeping the suggested time periods the same and attempting to add more reps in the same time intervals is already doing a density training protocol. The same is true for anyone doing the total GUTS volume and attempting to reduce the time to the suggested 24 minutes.

3) Ladders and Pyramids

Ladders are when you do multiple increasing sets. Pyramids are when you go up and down a ladder.

For instance, do sets of 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 pushups. Or 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 16, 14, 13, 10, 8, 6. Rest either a set time or based more on intuition. With pyramids, start coming down when you being to fatigue lightly but still have energy "in the bank" or else you won't be able to complete the pyramid.

Ladders and pyramids are a great way to get a lot of volume in. There's something psychological about it that tricks you into thinking it's going to be easier than it is, I think! Ladders and pyramids are kind of a cross between density training and grease the groove (although without the long rests during the day) and are also nice because the early sets serve as a warmup. I suspect that ladders have a similar training benefit to density training with some benefits of GTG, but also different in some ways. Ladders are great for increasing reps per set.

4) Multiple sets with lots of rest all in one workout session

This is where you do 3-10 sets of an exercise at 70-90% one set maximum with as much rest in between sets as you want (usually 90 seconds to 5 minutes), based on your intuition. I think this probably maximizes muscle size, but at a cost to overall steady-state conditioning compared to density training or ladders/pyramids because of the long rest periods (especially if you take several rest days a week to allow muscles to repair and eat lots of quality protein). This method probably doesn't lead to quite as much fat loss either unless you are doing very long intense sets (e.g. 50+ pushups, 150+ squats). If you are only doing sets of like 5-10 pushups, your heart won't get much work from the long rests. Of course there's no reason you can't mix and match training protocols to gain benefits of each.


There are probably more ways to train than that too, but those are the basic frameworks, The details matter quite a bit though, hence the usefulness of protocols like GUTS and John's upcoming books that spell out all the specifics. This is just a very general outline for possible training protocols.

Last edited by duff; 10-02-2010 at 03:29 PM. Reason: clarity
 
 
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Johnny Johnny is offline
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10-03-2010, 07:39 AM
 
Thank you very much Duff!
God Bless...
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