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Shaking during isometrics
 
 
sbslider sbslider is offline
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08-12-2012, 05:58 PM
 
I am practicing the isometrics in IPR and finding that during some of the movements that my related muscles shake a lot. Most noticeable are the pectoral contractions, my arms tend to shake significantly.

While I do not think this is a "problem" per se, I am interested in eliminating this shake and wonder if any forum members have insights on how do do this.

Thanks, Matt
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Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
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08-12-2012, 08:13 PM
 
Matt,

It is not really a problem. It just means you are creating a very high level of tension. Just make sure you breath properly and relax completely afterwards.

Greg
 
 
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sbslider sbslider is offline
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08-12-2012, 10:20 PM
 
Ok, thanks for the feedback Greg.

Matt
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Greybeard Greybeard is offline
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08-12-2012, 11:09 PM
 
Greg, Joe Bonomo had a tension coourse that encouraged shaking. He called it Vibro Pressure. Just another name for VSR's.
 
 
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Greg Newton Greg Newton is offline
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08-13-2012, 05:51 AM
 
You are right Greybeard. Bonomo actually encouraged his students to use so much tension that they began to shake. The Vibro course is one of the ones collected on the Sandow and the Golden Age of Ironmen site.

Bonomo led quite an interesting life. Writer, stuntman, actor, physical culturist and candy manufacturer! He even sold a 65 page book on everything he knew about women. It had 65 blank pages. Here is a picture of him and Charles Atlas.

Greg

 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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08-13-2012, 03:29 PM
 
Hey sbslider,

At first your muscles will shake when breaking into Isometric contraction because with Isometric tension you are activating muscle fibers that you previously have not. This will be obvious at first. However, after you have become truly adept at Isometric Contraction you'll get to the point that you don't shake at all.

---John Peterson

 
 
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sbslider sbslider is offline
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08-13-2012, 03:47 PM
 
Thank you for the feedback John, I wondered if time and practice would minimize or eliminate the shaking.

Matt
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xenonomicon xenonomicon is offline
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08-13-2012, 05:54 PM
 
The muscle spasming or twitch is the results of the nerves still firing. It takes some time to get used to isometrics. Though this shouldn't last longer than a week. You know you've done too much isometrics when you do muscle contractions in your sleep
 
 
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Andy62 Andy62 is offline
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08-13-2012, 08:12 PM
 
http://www.sandowplus.co.uk/Competit...ibro-intro.htm
 
 
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Shep Shep is offline
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08-14-2012, 05:04 AM
 
I was recently wondering about this myself, because occasionally it is my arms that shake (Biceps and Triceps isco presses/curls). Does it matter if you use 100% intensity every exercise as opposed to varying the intensity with each day or each set? I guess I should say do you build more muscle with 100% every exercise or do you get the same result from varying the intensity. I know the question sounds obvious, with the whole "give it your all" idea in modern exercise, but how does intensity affect Isometrics?
 
 
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