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The Purpose of a Foundational Routine
 
 
John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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04-23-2017, 04:15 PM
 
Hey friends,

I hope everyone is having a good day.

I have been asked about whether or not a foundational training routine could ultimately become counterproductive because you would be training the same muscle groups in the same way every day.

Great Question.

Answer: A foundational training routine is just that. It is a foundation that covers all the bases but allows you to expand and include other exercises to fulfill particular needs and desires that you have.

Example Charles Atlas ended his 12 Week Physical Culture Course with a Foundational Lifelong training routine of eight exercises that synergistically worked every muscle in the entire body. He called it his Perpetual Lesson. In the original 1922 edition of the course he stated that he performed each of the eight exercises 200 time each day. He later dropped that assertion probably because most men were easily intimidated at the thought.

Tha Atlas Perpetual Lesson consisted of:

#1) Atlas Push-Up
#2) Atlas Sit-Up
#3) Atlas Leg Raise
#4) Atlas Balance Squats
#5) Side Bends & Torso Circles
#6) Atlas Self Resistance Biceps Curls
#7) Atlas Multi-Plane Neck Movement
#8)Calf raises

The Foundational course that I got from my Grandfather included all of the above exercises plus 4-others he practiced 100 reps daily with the exception of the Standard Atlas Push-Up which he did 300 of each day.

I often switch in and out several others. The exercises that I have added to the 8 as standard are 1) Maximum Amplitude Arm Circles 2) Atlas II's 3) Atlas III's 4) The Milo. I often add a few other favorite exercises which include the V-Up ( Simultaneous Sit-Up and Leg Raise ), the Roman Chair Sit-Up, 8-Count Leg Raises, Alternate Vertical Leg Raises etc. Obviously, everything I do has a primary objective of maintaining a lean, hard, and sculpted waistline. Like my Grandfather and Uncles my waistline and how it appears is what Guides my Exercise Program.


---John Peterson

PS: Oftentimes during the day I will take a Push-Up break and do 100 Standard Atlas Push-Ups it takes only 3 minutes and it gets the oxygen pumping to every gland and tissue. A Total re-charge when practiced with the 5-6-7 Full Body LS-Iso Contraction.
 
 
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TimK TimK is offline
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04-29-2017, 12:47 PM
 
I have been thinking about your post for the last week or so. I think that "foundational routine" is vital.
For decades I have begun the day with the Five Rites or a series of hip, back, knee, and neck rotations followed by the gravity boots. Why? Because a wife, the mother of my children started having back operations (4 so far and now they want to put in some rods) at about 28 years old and I never wanted to go through that agony.
I do some breathing exercises that assist with elimination, and some stretching.
For the last couple of years I've started my daily pushups during what I consider my morning warmup.
Why? I feel better if I've stretched out my back and I look at it as a preventative to back issues. Same with the breathing exercises, a preventative.
But why have a "foundational routine?" The question opens all sorts of doors.
For a long time I thought of myself a weight-lifter or bodybuilder. I had a subscription to " Muscle and Fitness" for decades and any vacation I took I wanted to make sure there was a gym available. Of course by my early 50s my shoulders and a knee started giving me fits and then I met John.
The whole bullshit nature of the bodybuilding world became obvious to me. I was never going to look like the bodybuilders in the magazines because I never did steroids. Now I was plenty strong by most standards, age, weight, bone structure. But as I have asked before, "how strong does one need to be?"
When I mentioned to John that Charles Atlas by today's standards really did not have a fabulous build, John said that it was a build that all men could aspire to and attain. With all the movie stars, body-builders, pro-raslers looking like comic book super-heroes it is hard to remember that those bodies are made with steroids. Steve Reeves would not get an honorable mention in any of today's bodybuilding contests.
So what should we aspire to ?
Frankly, daily pushups, sit ups, body-weight squats with some stretching probably would be more than adequate to maintain a decent looking appearance and as men keep us virile into our 70s. Hence a "foundational routine" makes good sense.
For me moderation is for monks. I will tend to do hundreds of pushups a day, some DVRs, DSRs and pullups. But the foundation remains the same.

Tim
 
 
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TimK TimK is offline
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04-29-2017, 12:48 PM
 
I have been thinking about your post for the last week or so. I think that "foundational routine" is vital.
For decades I have begun the day with the Five Rites or a series of hip, back, knee, and neck rotations followed by the gravity boots. Why? Because a wife, the mother of my children started having back operations (4 so far and now they want to put in some rods) at about 28 years old and I never wanted to go through that agony.
I do some breathing exercises that assist with elimination, and some stretching.
For the last couple of years I've started my daily pushups during what I consider my morning warmup.
Why? I feel better if I've stretched out my back and I look at it as a preventative to back issues. Same with the breathing exercises, a preventative.
But why have a "foundational routine?" The question opens all sorts of doors.
For a long time I thought of myself a weight-lifter or bodybuilder. I had a subscription to " Muscle and Fitness" for decades and any vacation I took I wanted to make sure there was a gym available. Of course by my early 50s my shoulders and a knee started giving me fits and then I met John.
The whole bullshit nature of the bodybuilding world became obvious to me. I was never going to look like the bodybuilders in the magazines because I never did steroids. Now I was plenty strong by most standards, age, weight, bone structure. But as I have asked before, "how strong does one need to be?"
When I mentioned to John that Charles Atlas by today's standards really did not have a fabulous build, John said that it was a build that all men could aspire to and attain. With all the movie stars, body-builders, pro-raslers looking like comic book super-heroes it is hard to remember that those bodies are made with steroids. Steve Reeves would not get an honorable mention in any of today's bodybuilding contests.
So what should we aspire to ?
Frankly, daily pushups, sit ups, body-weight squats with some stretching probably would be more than adequate to maintain a decent looking appearance and as men keep us virile into our 70s. Hence a "foundational routine" makes good sense.
For me moderation is for monks. I will tend to do hundreds of pushups a day, some DVRs, DSRs and pullups. But the foundation remains the same.

Tim
 
 
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andrew stone andrew stone is offline
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05-02-2017, 03:44 AM
 
Hi Tim
That was a great post full of common sense!
Andrew
 
 
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gbjj gbjj is offline
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05-09-2017, 06:40 AM
 
This is a great post guys, thanks for the insight. I struggle with exactly this issue. Coming up with a repeatable dependable core routine that I can do that covers the bases.

My main issue is coming up with numbers and sets, and how to implement.

#1. Is your main idea to complete all of your movements several times, and each cycle through perhaps go to 70% of your max. Or some simulation of that idea? Having a solid routine I can perform in the mornings on my off running days is top priority for me.





Thanks
__________________
-Jon
(S.D.G.)
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is offline
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05-09-2017, 12:36 PM
 
Hello Jon,

I personally think that having manageable circuits is by far the best and most efficient method of training body, mind, and muscle while conserving time. I know that circuit training Charles Atlas style was exactly what my own Grandfather did for decades before it was ever called Circuit Training.

The great thing about circuits is that You can vary the intensity and tempo daily.


---John Peterson


 
 
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