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Progressing With The Atlas Methods
 
 
John Peterson John Peterson is online now
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11-06-2019, 05:28 PM
 
Hello Everyone,

I received another e-mail from an Atlas 'purist' that thinks that my endorsement of weight vest training is a betrayal of the Atlas methods I learned as a kid.

My Response: BULL ROAR!!!

Here's the deal. You can perform the Atlas exercises in 'High Volume' and achieve fantastic results. I know I certainly did when I was a kid and also throughout my life. The only thing I was missing was Power Belt Isometrics.

The Atlas exercises will make you extremely strong, flexible, and enduring from virtually ALL angles especially as relates to one's strength to bodyweight ratio.

However, if your goal is to gain a great deal of added strength for wrestling or other sports from performing Atlas's exercises exclusively then adding a weight vest and performing your Atlas Exercises while your body is making adaptation to the additional weight would be one way to dramatically increase full-body strength.

Let's say that you are currently doing sets of 50 or more on your Atlas Push-Ups & Squats (That is certainly considered high volume). By using a weight vest you might start out with 15 or 20 pounds for sets of 15 to 25 reps then as soon as you hit 25 reps you add another 5 to 10 pounds and start at 15 to 20 reps and work up to sets of 25. From there you can start doing high volume sets of 40 or more if you really want to and believe me, by the time you're doing sets of 40 or more with 30 or more pounds in the weight vest you will have built a great deal of added strength and lung capacity far beyond what the Atlas exercises alone performed at the same volume would have yielded. This is not rocket science but it is common sense. Is it necessary to add that much strength? Probably not for everyday life. BUT if you're a rock climber, a wrestler, mixed martial artist, kayaker or adventurer it could give you a great deal of added strength. One type of exercise with a weight vest that could give extraordinary levels of functional strength for outdoor sports would be the Animal movements that BennyB is so fond of doing.

---John Peterson

 
 
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gbjj gbjj is offline
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11-07-2019, 04:38 AM
 
Has anyone ordered the Charles Atlas Course from the official Charles Atlas Site... it's listed at $54.95.
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bennyb bennyb is offline
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11-07-2019, 12:57 PM
 
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Dynamic-Ten...-/382663009734


Less than 40 on eBay.
 
 
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John Peterson John Peterson is online now
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11-07-2019, 01:52 PM
 
Hello Jon,

I have an original Atlas Course from its first publication in 1922 before the Atlas Method was copyrighted and trademarked as 'Dynamic Tension' in 1929. The original course had no photos. It was virtually the same as later editions but in the Lesson on Arm development, it recommended holding small pieces of 'angle iron' to focus the intensity of the muscle contractions. It also listed the same 8-Perpetual Exercises in Lesson #13 but advised performing 200 repetitions of each exercise. The number advised was then removed from the course by Chares Roman in 1929 after he bought out Dr. Fredrich Tilney and had coined the term 'Dynamic Tension'.

I also have a couple of copies of the course from sometime in the 1930s and even 1940s and can tell you that the exercises never changed. My latest edition was from the early 1980s. It too was identical in content to the early editions.

The original course gave no instructions on sets and repetitions or advice on how to determine your level of intensity. About the only means of progression advocated was achieving the high volume of 200 reps each on the 8-exercises of the perpetual lesson. In fact, I remember when a friend of mine by the name of Stan Cooper in 7th grade received his copy and showed it to the guys in gym class. The truth was that the instructions were not clear on whether the exercises were performed with movement or statically as in Isometrics. Even Mr.Luke didn't know. I was then able to tell them how the exercises were to be done based on what I learned from my grandfather and uncles and he thought it made good sense.

As relates to the newest edition, I have no idea whether the newest edition has the same basic content as the original.

---John Peterson

 
 
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